Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (The Tenth Doctor)
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Century House The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Tom MacRae Notes: After writing Rise Of The Cybermen / The Age Of Steel for Doctor Who's 2006 season, MacRae was commissioned to pen “Century House” for the following year. It wound up not fitting into the schedule for the 2007 season, however, and so it was deferred it until 2008. Because of its almost exclusive focus on the Doctor, it was intended that “Century House” would be made as part of the season's sixth production block, double-banked with Turn Left (Block Seven), which shone the spotlight firmly on Donna Noble. However, executive producer Russell T Davies grew unsatisfied with the premise that he had given MacRae -- of the Doctor appearing on the supernatural documentary programme Most Haunted. He also worried about the season having two comedy-oriented episodes in The Unicorn And The Wasp and “Century House”, especially since these were planned to air consecutively. Finally, in mid-October 2007, it was decided to replace “Century House” with Davies' own script, Midnight.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Martha (original version), Donna (revised version)
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Nine (original version), eighth episode of Season Thirty (revised version)
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: While Donna watches with Sylvia at home, the Doctor joins a live broadcast of paranormal reality show Most Haunted. Their target is an old house purportedly haunted by the “Red Widow”. The climax would have involved the house catching fire.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #20, Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale

A Midwinter's Tale The Tenth Doctor
Writers: Russell T Davies, Phil Ford Notes: The basic idea of a person (originally, the father of the family) suddenly finding himself alone in a deserted hotel at Christmas was a potential storyline Davies conceived for the 2008 Christmas special, a spot eventually taken by The Next Doctor. Some months later, he decided to revisit it for what was intended to be the 2009 Christmas special, which he would be cowriting with Ford. Davies also drew upon elements of a second Christmas 2008 idea, in which the Earth is transformed into a fantasy landscape generated by the dormant mind of Harry Potter author JK Rowling. The character of the grandmother grew out of Davies' desire to include a strong, older female as one of the temporary companions featured in the 2009 specials. Ford took these ideas and developed a storyline called “A Midwinter's Tale”. However, Davies was already beginning to have misgivings about the adventure, as he feared that it would be impractical to stage a deserted London and was unsure that the notion could generate enough incident for a one-hour special. After reading Ford's treatment, he decided that the fantasy element was too strong, and concluded that “A Midwinter's Tale” represented a “dead end” for the special. He had already devised a replacement idea, and this evolved into The Waters Of Mars. The essential idea for “A Midwinter's Tale” was ultimately used as the basis for The Empty Planet, part of the fourth season of The Sarah Jane Adventures.
Characters: The Eleventh Doctor, “Gran”
Episodes: 1 (60-minute)
Planned For: Second 2009 special
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A grandmother is trapped in a posh hotel with her unruly family. Wishing that they'd all just disappear, she storms out of their suite to fetch some ice, only to find the corridors deserted. Returning to her rooms, she discovers that her family has indeed disappeared -- but so has all of humanity. Finally, she comes upon the TARDIS and the Doctor. Investigating, they discover eight-legged centaur-like creatures abroad in London. It transpires that aliens from another dimension, the Shi'ar, have frozen time on Earth in order to hold a festival celebrating the marriage of their queen. The life of the grandmother's family becomes endangered, culminating in a race through secret tunnels beneath Buckingham Palace.
References: Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale -- The Final Chapter

The 1920s The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Stephen Fry Notes: Fry had been associated with Doctor Who via his role as the Minister of Chance in the webcast Death Comes To Time before being invited to contribute to the new Doctor Who series' second season. The 1920s setting was inspired by his screenplay for the 2003 feature film Bright Young Things. In development from about June 2005, “The 1920s” was intended to form part of the season's sixth production block. By November, however, it was realised that Fry's script would be too much of a drain on the programme's budget late in the year, and the decision was made to defer it to the 2007 season; it was replaced by Fear Her. However, the script would have to undergo rewrites -- not least to replace Rose Tyler with Martha Jones -- and Fry was now occupied with other commitments. By mid-2006, “The 1920s” was withdrawn from the schedule altogether.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Rose
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Eleventh episode of Season Twenty-Eight; Season Twenty-Nine
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a popular British legend which turns out to have an extraterrestrial connection.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #14

The Suicide Exhibition The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Mark Gatiss Notes: Gatiss began working on this script around the start of 2006, at which point it was sent during World War I. By early 2007, the setting had been shifted to the Second World War and “The Suicide Exhibition” was intended to be the third episode of Doctor Who's 2008 season. Some thought was given to filming in the Natural History Museum itself, but executive producer Russell T Davies gradually became concerned about revisiting the World War II period so soon after it was showcased in 2005's The Empty Child / The Doctor Dances. Furthermore, Davies was becoming excited by the possibility of setting an adventure around the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. Finally, near the end of April 2007, it was decided to replace “The Suicide Exhibition” with The Fires Of Pompeii. Later that summer, scripting problems on this episode and Partners In Crime led Davies to consider abandoning The Fires Of Pompeii and reinstating Gatiss' script, but this did not come to pass.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Donna
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Third episode of Season Thirty
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: During the Second World War, a Nazi task force assaults the Natural History Museum in London, which has been overrun by monsters. Later action would have involved the discovery of a secret chamber beneath the museum.
References: Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale, Doctor Who Magazine #431, DWM Special Edition #26

(untitled) The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Russell T Davies Notes: Davies began considering this notion while on holiday in July 2007. He had unsuccessfully approached Rowling -- author of the hugely popular Harry Potter novels -- about writing for Doctor Who in 2004, and now hoped to persuade her to appear in the programme instead, as the focus of the 2008 Christmas special. Although she was not an actress, Davies felt that Rowling was one of the few celebrities who might be even more famous than Kylie Minogue, who was appearing in the 2007 Christmas special Voyage Of The Damned. However, David Tennant indicated that he felt the idea veered to close to being a Doctor Who spoof, and Davies was already becoming concerned about the likelihood of Rowling accepting the role. In mid-August, he decided to return to his original idea for the 2008 special, which would evolve into The Next Doctor.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor
Episodes: 1 (60-minute)
Planned For: 2008 Christmas special
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: On Christmas Eve, an alien creature attaches itself to author JK Rowling. Suddenly, the real world is replaced by a magical reality influenced by the writer's own imagination. The Doctor must battle witches and wizards to reach Rowling and put the world to rights.
References: Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale

(untitled) The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Matthew Graham Notes: When meeting with executive producers Russell T Davies and Julie Gardner in late August 2005 about writing a back-up script for Doctor Who (which would be used in the 2006 season in case of emergency, and otherwise would be retained for the next year), Graham offered this story idea. It was decided that he would instead pursue a concept suggested by Davies, which became Fear Her.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Rose
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-Eight and Twenty-Nine
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Involved a villain who has discovered how to drain things of their beauty, and has reduced his planet to a sterile grey landscape.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #14

(untitled) The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Unknown Notes: Over the course of 2004, executive producer Russell T Davies developed the idea of a Doctor Who story intertwining Queen Victoria, werewolves, and warrior monks like those in the movie Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; the first two elements were partially inspired by The Unquiet Dead, a ghost story featuring Charles Dickens. Davies gave this concept to an unknown writer to develop as an unslotted story (to be used either in an emergency during the 2006 season or possibly for the 2007 season). With the resulting storyline eschewing both the werewolf and monk elements, however, the production team determined that the writer had not delivered the pitch they desired. Davies ended up tackling the scripting duties himself, and the result became Tooth And Claw.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Rose
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-Eight and Twenty-Nine
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set at Buckingham Palace, this story concerned Queen Victoria getting an alien insect in her eye.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #14