Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (The First Doctor)
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Alexander The Great see Farewell Great Macedon

Britain 408 AD The First Doctor
Writer: Malcolm Hulke Notes: “Britain 408 AD” was first submitted on September 2nd, 1963. Story editor David Whitaker asked Hulke to revise his original storyline, however; he felt that the plot -- with its many opposing factions -- was too complicated, and also that the serial's conclusion echoed that of 100,000 BC too closely. It was hoped that an amended version of “Britain 408 AD” might occupy the sixth slot of Season One (Serial F), to be directed by Christopher Barry, but on September 23rd it was decided that the production block did not need another historical story and Hulke's serial was abandoned. The spot in the schedule was ultimately occupied by The Aztecs, while Hulke began work on “The Hidden Planet” instead. Following Whitaker's departure, Hulke resubmitted “Britain 408 AD”. It was rejected on April 2nd, 1965, by Whitaker's successor, Dennis Spooner, because the Romans had already featured in his own The Romans.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara (original submission; the resubmission presumably replaced Susan with Vicki)
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Seasons One and Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved the departure of the Romans from Britain around the start of the fifth century in the midst of clashes against the Celts and the Saxons, culminating with the time travellers fleeing the indigenous savages back to the safety of the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Clock The First Doctor
Writer: David Ellis Notes: “The Clock” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Dark Planet The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles' storyline was rejected on February 26th, 1965 because story editor Dennis Spooner feared that it hewed too closely to Malcolm Hulke's unused serial “The Hidden Planet”. The intended episode titles were 1. The City Of Silence, 2. The Shadow People, 3. The Doomed Planet, 4. The Caves Of Night, 5. The Sun Bomb, 6. Invasion By Darkness. In September 2013, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Dark Planet” by Matt Fitton.
Characters: The First Doctor, Ian, Barbara, Vicki
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on the planet Numir, whose sun has been extinguished. The people of Numir have become divided into two factions: the surface-dwelling Light people and the subterranean Shadow people. The Doctor, Barbara and the TARDIS are captured by the Shadow people, but rescued by Teelss and the Light people using a powerful laser weapon. However, the time travellers discover that the Light people are fanatics who intend to launch a “sun bomb”: an artificial sun which will eradicate the Shadow people. But the Shadow people have snuck into the city by hiding in the TARDIS. Seizing control of the laser weapon, they destroy the sun bomb. The time travellers escape in the TARDIS, even as Numir is destroyed in the conflagration.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7, Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Evil Eye The First Doctor
Writer: Geoffrey Orme Notes: “The Evil Eye” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Face Of God The First Doctor
Writer: John Wiles Notes: Wiles appears to have contemplated this idea while he served as producer of Doctor Who in 1965.
Characters: The First Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Season Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In space, a massive countenance materialises in front of the TARDIS; the being claims to be God, but this is eventually revealed to be a hoax.
References: Doctor Who: The Sixties

Farewell Great Macedon The First Doctor
aka Alexander The Great
Writer: Moris Farhi Notes: Although a sample script written by Farhi, “The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance”, was rejected by story editor David Whitaker, he was nonetheless encouraged to continue to develop ideas for Doctor Who. Aware that Farhi was interested in Greco-Roman mythology, on January 24th, 1964 Whitaker suggested an adventure about the Greek pirate Barbarossa, in which the Doctor would be forced to invite somebody into the TARDIS. Farhi instead began work on “Farewell Great Macedon” (also called “Alexander The Great ”); such was his enthusiasm for the project that he ignored Whitaker's advice to write only one script and instead produced a full six-part serial. His episodes bore the titles 1. The Hanging Gardens Of Babylon, 2. The Wrath Of The Greatest Grecian Of Them All! or O, Son! My Son!, 3. A Man Must Die, 4. The World Lies Dead At Your Feet, 5. In The Arena, 6. Farewell, Great Macedon!. The first episode, notably, would have explained the time travellers' ability to understand other languages by showing them hooked up to a computer which teaches them Ancient Greek. Initially, Whitaker felt that Farhi's scripts simply needed tightening up, but after the transmission of Marco Polo, the production office apparently elected to gear the historical adventures such that they were set on the periphery, rather than in the midst, of famous historical events, in response to criticism from schools (although this must have been abandoned by the time The Romans was made less than a year later). Farhi was unwilling to rewrite his storyline to reflect this edict, and so “Farewell Great Macedon” was abandoned on July 31st. In November 2010, Big Finish Production released an audio adaptation of “Farewell Great Macedon” by John Dorney.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS materialises amidst the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, where the Doctor and his companions meet Alexander the Great. Four members of Alexander's retinue, however, are plotting to murder the king and his successors so that one of their number, Seleucus, can ascend to the throne and allow them to return to their homeland. The conspirators try to frame the time travellers, but the Doctor and Ian succeed in a series of trials and Alexander's bodyguard, Ptolemy, proves their innocence. However, history cannot be changed, and despite the Doctor's efforts to save the king's life by having Ian build an iron lung, Alexander dies while Ptolemy helps the companions escape to the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #294

The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance The First Doctor
Writer: Moris Farhi Notes: On January 6th, 1964, Farhi contacted story editor David Whitaker about writing for Doctor Who. Whitaker commissioned a script for one episode, which became “The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance”. Whitaker rejected this on the 24th, feeling its subject matter was unsuitable for Doctor Who, but encouraged Farhi to continue to develop ideas for the programme. In November 2010, Big Finish Production released an audio adaptation of “The Fragrant Yellow Arc Of Fragrance” by John Dorney.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 1
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: On an alien planet, a man named Rhythm woos Barbara. She is unaware, however, that her rejection of his advances mean that Rhythm is now sentenced to die.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Giants The First Doctor
Writer: CE Webber Notes: The “miniscules” idea originated in Webber's earliest format guide for Doctor Who, which had been written by May 1963. The first episode was outlined in a subsequent iteration of the guide dated May 16th, with the description of the concluding episodes completed by June 4th. Rex Tucker was assigned to direct “The Giants”. Biddy, Cliff and Lola would eventually become Susan, Ian and Barbara, while the idea of the Doctor being explicitly referred to as “Dr Who” would go effectively unused. Doctor Who creator Sydney Newman disliked the use of the caterpillar and spider as “monsters” and felt the story lacked incident and character. However, it appears that it may have been the technical limitations of the outdated Lime Grove studio where Doctor Who was to be recorded which forced the abandonment of “The Giants” in favour of 100,000 BC. The miniaturisation idea was unsuccessfully reused in a treatment by Robert Gould before finally making it to the screen in the form of Planet Of Giants by Louis Marks.
Characters: Dr. Who, Sue, Cliff, Lola
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The first serial of Season One
Stage Reached: Scripts for episodes one and two
Synopsis: Teenager Sue and her teachers Lola and Cliff meet a strange old man in the fog. Calling him Dr. Who, they discover that his home appears to be a police box, and it is in fact a time machine larger on the inside than on the outside. Wrong buttons are pressed and the four are transported to Cliff's science class laboratory, but reduced to just an eighth of an inch in height. There, Cliff and Sue are separated from the Ship and are menaced by a caterpillar, a spider, a student's compass and a microscope lens. Finally, they manage to communicate with the students and their teacher and are returned to the time machine.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #209, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Hands Of Aten The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles was commissioned to write a storyline for “The Hands Of Aten” on November 16th, 1965. It was abandoned on January 17th, 1966 because departing story editor Donald Tosh felt that it did not fit the vision espoused by the incoming production team of Innes Lloyd and Gerry Davis.
Characters: The First Doctor, Steven, Dodo
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #196, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Hearsay Machine The First Doctor
Writer: George Kerr Notes: This idea was submitted around the start of April 1966 and rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Four, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Heavy Scent Of Violence The First Doctor
Writer: George Kerr Notes: This idea was submitted around the start of April 1966 and rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Four, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Herdsmen Of Aquarius The First Doctor
aka The Herdsmen Of Venus
Writer: Donald Cotton Notes: Submitted by Cotton following the completion of The Gunfighters, it was likely not viewed by story editor Gerry Davis as being in line with his and producer Innes Lloyd's more serious vision of Doctor Who. Lloyd and Davis had also complained that Cotton was difficult to contact. “The Herdsmen” was apparently rejected on June 15th, 1966, although it still appears on documentation dated August of that year.
Characters: The First Doctor, Steven, Dodo
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved the revelation that the Loch Ness Monster was a type of cattle bred by Aquarian (or Venusian) farmers.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #221, Doctor Who: The Sixties

The Herdsmen Of Venus see The Herdsmen Of Aquarius

The Hidden Planet The First Doctor
Writer: Malcolm Hulke Notes: This was an idea submitted by Hulke on September 2nd, 1963, after being invited to contribute to Doctor Who in July. Although it was not initially pursued by the production team, on September 23rd, Hulke was asked to stop working on “Britain 408 AD” and begin developing “The Hidden Planet” instead. In mid-October, “The Hidden Planet” was pencilled in as the seventh story of Season One, then pushed back to eighth by the time of its formal commissioning on December 2nd, due to the insertion of Inside The Spaceship into the running order. A month later, “The Hidden Planet” had been promoted to the fifth spot, due to difficulties with two other ../serials. Unfortunately, when Hulke delivered his script for episode one in January 1964, the production team found it unacceptable and asked Hulke to undertake rewrites; The Keys Of Marinus was hastily commissioned to take its place. Hulke disputed the rewrites, arguing that the episode one script had adhered to the accepted storyline and that he should therefore be paid extra for any rewrites. This request was refused, and in March, Hulke agreed to revise his scripts. Subsequently, the second installment was given the title The Year Of The Lame Dog. In April, “The Hidden Planet” was a possible second story for Doctor Who's second recording block. By July, Hulke had rewritten the adventure as a five-parter, and consideration was given to making it first in the second block. However, it was felt that too much work would be needed to restructure “The Hidden Planet” following the departure of Susan, and there was also concern about the adventure's lack of monsters, now viewed as a key component of the programme's science-fiction ../serials. “The Hidden Planet” was therefore abandoned by story editor David Whitaker on September 24th, with its formal rejection coming on October 20th. Hulke resubmitted his storyline to the production office following Whitaker's departure from Doctor Who, but it was again rejected on April 2nd, 1965 by new story editor Dennis Spooner, because it still included Ian and Barbara, who were about to exit the series.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara (originally; the resubmission presumably replaced Susan with Vicki)
Episodes: 6 (original submission); 5 (resubmission)
Planned For: Seasons One, Two and Three
Stage Reached: Probably partial script
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on “the Tenth Planet”, a world identical to the Earth but whose orbit around the Sun is diametrically opposite to our planet's, and which has therefore gone undetected. This world is very much like Earth, but there are subtle differences: four-leaf clovers are plentiful, for example, and glass refracts oddly. Most notably, women are the dominant sex while men struggle for equality. The leader of the planet is Barbara's double, and Barbara is kidnapped by rebels. Meanwhile, the Doctor, Susan and Ian are embroiled in the struggle for male suffrage.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #310, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Hounds Of Time The First Doctor The Second Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: This storyline appears to have been submitted around the time that Hayles completed The Smugglers in mid-1966. It was discovered by Mark Hayles amongst his late father's files.
Characters: The First or Second Doctor, Ben, Polly
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A scientist named Melloris has despatched robotic hunters to capture humans from throughout Earth's history and bring them to his laboratory on the planet Terrin. Amongst those kidnapped are Ben and Polly, but the Doctor pursues them to Terrin and confronts Melloris. He discovers that Terrin's warlord, Vartan, is studying mankind in order to determine the optimal point in history to invade and make Earth a vassal of Terrin. The controlling computer now identifies 1970 as the crucial year. Having second thoughts, Melloris tries to stop Vartan but is killed. However, Ben and Polly escape from the trap, and the Doctor sabotages the computer with a logical paradox, depriving Vartan of the power he needs to launch the invasion.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Living Planet The First Doctor
Writer: Alan Wakeman Notes: Wakeman was part of an early set of writers approached in summer 1963 to contribute to Doctor Who, which was still in development. Wakeman's storyline, “The Living Planet”, was deemed to have sufficient potential that the script for the first episode was commissioned on July 31st. (References on some production documents which described this script as a “pilot” would later provoke erroneous speculation that Wakeman's episode may have been considered as an alternative to launch Doctor Who in lieu of 100,000 BC.) At this point, the Doctor's granddaughter was still known as Suzanne (rather than Susan) and her female teacher was Barbara Canning (instead of Barbara Wright). Wakeman also used ideas for the programme's backstory developed by 100,000 BC writer Anthony Coburn but ultimately discarded, in which Suzanne is really an alien princess named Findooclare and she and the Doctor are being pursued by the mysterious Palladins. Wakeman's planned episode titles were Airfish, What Eats What?, The Living Planet, and Just In Time. “The Living Planet” was deemed to be too sophisticated for the intended child audience and abandoned. In 2005, following Doctor Who's successful return to television, Wakeman unsuccessfully offered “The Living Planet” to executive producer Russell T Davies.
Characters: The First Doctor, Suzanne, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on a planet whose surface is largely covered with a pattern of small, edible hexagonal structures. The travellers are attacked by flying metallic fish which also surround the TARDIS. The Doctor fears that the mysterious Palladins have finally caught up to himself and Suzanne, but they are saved when long stems extend out from the hexagons, spearing the animals. They realise that the fish are part of the planet's bizarre ecosystem. Drawn by a strange, maddening sound, they discover a series of holes, down which Suzanne becomes trapped. Ian ventures into a hole to rescue her, and they deduce that the entire planet is a gigantic living organism -- the hexagons are like skin cells and the holes permit respiration. The planet tries to absorb the TARDIS, but its alien construction is incompatible and the planet is forced to release it, allowing the travellers to escape.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Summer Special 1994, DWM Special Edition #4, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Man From The Met The First Doctor
Writer: George Kerr Notes: This idea was submitted around the start of April 1966 and rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Four, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Masters Of Luxor The First Doctor
aka The Robots
Writer: Anthony Coburn Notes: When Coburn's 100,000 BC, Doctor Who's original second serial, was pushed ahead to replace “The Giants” in June 1963, Coburn was commissioned on June 18th to supply a replacement second story as well, to be directed by Rex Tucker. When Coburn left the BBC to become a freelance writer, the serial had to be recommissioned; this happened on July 3rd, by which time it had gained the title “The Robots” and had been expanded from four to six episodes. “The Robots” was originally set on thirtieth-century Earth, but by the end of the month its location had been shifted to an alien planet. The production team grew increasingly unhappy with “The Robots”, however, and on September 23rd decided to switch it in the running order with the intended fifth story, The Daleks. The following month, the scripts gained a new title, “The Masters Of Luxor”. Around the start of 1964, “Luxor” was postponed until Season Two, at one point being considered for the sixth slot of Doctor Who's second production block. By the end of the year, however, the decision had been made to drop “The Masters Of Luxor” from the schedule altogether. The episode titles for the serial were: 1. The Cannibal Flower, 2. The Mockery Of A Man, 3. A Light On The Dead Planet, 4. Tabon Of Luxor, 5. An Infinity Of Surprises, 6. The Flower Blooms (originally The Flower In Bloom). In August 1992, Titans Books published “The Masters Of Luxor” as a script book, edited by John McElroy. Then, in August 2012, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation by Nigel Robinson.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 4 (original submission); 6 (resubmission)
Planned For: Seasons One and Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS is drawn by a signal to one of the moons of Luxor. There they discover the world dominated by robots led by the Perfect One. The Perfect One has been experimenting on people to discover the secret of life, and kidnaps Barbara and Susan; he plans to use them as test subjects before draining their life force. The Doctor and Ian escape to the wilderness, where they find and reawaken Tabon, the scientist who invented the Perfect One. Tabon confronts the Perfect One, sending the robots out of control. The robots kill Tabon and destroy the Perfect One while the time travellers escape in the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who: The Scripts: The Masters Of Luxor, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine #331, DWM Special Edition #7

The Nazis The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles was commissioned to write a storyline for “The Nazis” on March 8th, 1966. Shortly thereafter, however, he was engaged to write The Smugglers, which he was told should take a higher priority. “The Nazis” was ultimately abandoned on June 15th, with the sentiment being that the events it portrayed were too close to the present day.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #321, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The New Armada The First Doctor
Writer: David Whitaker Notes: By late February 1964, story editor Whitaker had decided to write one of the first recording block's final ../serials himself. Gerald Blake was allocated to direct. Not long after, though, he began casting about for a replacement for this untitled Armada story, eventually finding it in the form of The Reign Of Terror. By mid-April, Whitaker was considering using his Armada tale as the first serial of Doctor Who's second production block (so that it would have been broadcast after The Dalek Invasion Of Earth), although this did not ultimately come to pass. Long afterward, having since left the programme, Whitaker submitted a storyline entitled “The New Armada” -- presumably a revised version of his original idea -- to the Doctor Who production office. This was rejected on January 17th, 1966 by then-story editor Gerry Davis, who felt it was too complex, with a preponderance of characters and subplots. Nonetheless, Davis invited Whitaker to submit further ideas, eventually leading to Whitaker writing The Power Of The Daleks.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Seasons One, Two and Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set in sixteenth-century Spain after the Armada.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

Nothing At The End Of The Lane The First Doctor
Writer: CE Webber Notes: Barely even rating as a “lost” story, this was the title for Doctor Who's first episode suggested by Webber in the programme's developing format guide, circa early May 1963. Biddy, Lola and Cliff would eventually become Susan, Barbara and Ian, while the idea of the Doctor being explicitly referred to as “Dr. Who” would go effectively unused. Series creator Sydney Newman also disliked the idea of the Ship being invisible. “Nothing At The End Of The Lane” would be replaced by “The Giants”.
Characters: Dr. Who, Biddy, Cliff, Lola
Episodes: 1
Planned For: The first episode of Season One
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Teenager Biddy and her teachers Lola and Cliff meet a strange, amnesiac old man and discover his invisible time machine.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #208, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Ocean Liner The First Doctor
Writer: David Ellis Notes: “The Ocean Liner” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A spy thriller.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The People Who Couldn't Remember The First Doctor
Writers: David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke Notes: After being submitted in April 1966, the satirical “The People Who Couldn't Remember” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th. Davis wanted to avoid outright comedies in the wake of the poor reception of The Gunfighters.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Polly and Ben?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #212, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Red Fort The First Doctor
Writer: Terry Nation Notes: The scripts were commissioned on September 24th, 1963. It appears that Nation, who had not particularly enjoyed writing The Daleks, did little work on “The Red Fort”, and may have even forgotten about it entirely. “The Red Fort” was intended to be the eighth story of Season One (then pushed back to ninth when Inside The Spaceship was added to the schedule in November), but was dropped altogether on January 21st, 1964. At this time, Nation was asked to write The Keys Of Marinus instead.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 7
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Storyline, possibly partial script
Synopsis: The time travellers become embroiled in the Indian Mutiny of 1857, when Indian troops rose up against the colonial officers of the British East India Company. Presumably, the assault on the Red Fort -- a Moghul palace in Delhi -- on May 11th, 1857, would have featured prominently.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #310, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Robots see The Masters Of Luxor

The Slide The First Doctor
Writer: Victor Pemberton Notes: Pemberton's storyline was rejected on September 24th, 1964, by story editor David Whitaker, who felt that “The Slide” was a “stewpot” of earlier Doctor Who science-fiction ideas with a hint of Nigel Kneale's Quatermass ../serials. However, Pemberton had also submitted a version of “The Slide” to BBC Radio on August 17th; this audio treatment saw the Doctor replaced by Chilean seismologist Professor Joseph Gomez. This seven-part version of “The Slide” was transmitted weekly on the BBC Light Programme beginning on February 13th, 1966. The following year, Pemberton adapted “The Slide” as the Doctor Who adventure Fury From The Deep.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian Barbara
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Two
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A sentient form of mud emerges from a fissure and begins to take over the minds of British townsfolk.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #277, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Son Of Doctor Who The First Doctor
Writer: None (originated by William Hartnell) Notes: Hartnell was interested in playing characters other than the Doctor in Doctor Who. As a mechanism for achieving this, he suggested that he could also play the Doctor's son, who would be an adversary for the Doctor. This does not appear to have been seriously pursued.
Characters: The First Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Seasons Two or Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor encounters his evil time-travelling son, to whom he bears an uncanny physical resemblance.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #233

The White Witch The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles was commissioned to write a storyline for “The White Witch” on November 16th, 1965. It was abandoned on January 17th, 1966 because departing story editor Donald Tosh felt that it did not fit the vision espoused by the incoming production team of Innes Lloyd and Gerry Davis.
Characters: The First Doctor, Steven, Dodo
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #196, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

(untitled) The First Doctor
Writer: Robert Gould Notes: With the abandonment of CE Webber's “The Giants”, Gould was asked to make a fresh attempt at a “miniscules” story. By mid-September 1963, this was intended to be the fourth serial of Season One (following Marco Polo); it was pushed back one slot following the insertion into the schedule of Inside The Spaceship in November. In early January 1964, however, Gould's story was removed from the schedule and the writer met with story editor David Whitaker on February 4th to discuss the difficulties he was having. At this time, it was agreed that Gould would stop working on the miniaturisation concept and try his hand at something else. A third attempt at the “miniscules” idea was made by Louis Marks, and this finally saw production as Planet Of Giants.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Storyline; possibly partial script
Synopsis: The TARDIS crew are shrunk to one-sixteenth of an inch in size. They are menaced by carpet dust “storms”, falling cigarette ash, and other creatures, and must figure out how to obtain food and water.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

(untitled) The First Doctor
Writer: Robert Gould Notes: On February 4th, 1964, Gould and story editor David Whitaker agreed to abandon the “miniscules” idea Gould had been working on for some months. Whitaker offered to entertain another storyline from the writer, and Gould suggested this concept. Producer Verity Lambert subsequently noted her concern that this might be too similar to the John Wyndham novel The Day Of The Triffids. On the 9th, Gould informed Whitaker that he had decided against taking the idea any further. However, on March 26th, Whitaker was forced to defend episode three of The Keys Of Marinus against Gould's assertion that it made use of his “plants vs people” notion. Whitaker successfully demonstrated to BBC Head of Serials Donald Wilson that no plagiarism had occurred.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Seasons One or Two
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Would have concerned a planet where plants treat people the way people on Earth treat plants.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #310, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

(untitled) The First Doctor
Writer: John Lucarotti Notes: On February 26th, 1965, Lucarotti agreed to develop an idea for an historical story set in India. He contacted former Doctor Who director Waris Hussein, who indicated that such a story would probably have to be set within the past couple of centuries, and suggested the 1857 Indian Mutiny as a possibility. Lucarotti was keen on the idea, but story editor Dennis Spooner informed him that a new policy forbade historicals set after 1600. Lucarotti would ultimately write The Massacre Of St Bartholomew's Eve in its place.
Characters: The First Doctor, Ian, Barbara, Vicki
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Would have involved the time travellers in the events of the 1857 Indian Mutiny (see the entry on “The Red Fort” for more information on this incident).
References: Doctor Who Magazine #233

(untitled) The First Doctor
Writer: John Lucarotti Notes: In the spring of 1965, after his initial proposal of an historical set around the 1857 Indian Mutiny was rejected, Lucarotti gained agreement from story editor Dennis Spooner to instead write a storyline for a serial involving the Vikings, and particularly Erik the Red (whom Lucarotti confused with his offspring, Leif Eriksson). Lucarotti began writing his storyline for Ian, Barbara and Vicki, although he knew that Ian and Barbara would likely have to be replaced. When Donald Tosh succeeded Spooner, he was unaware of Lucarotti's project, and contacted him independently. Tosh and incoming producer John Wiles were initially satisfied with the Viking storyline, asking only that Lucarotti make a few changes to bring it in line with their vision of Doctor Who. On June 24th, shortly after making these changes, Lucarotti was surprised to learn his storyline had been rejected. Frustrated at having two proposals turned down, Lucarotti contacted his agents, who soon earned him a commission to write The Massacre Of St Bartholomew's Eve. In 1992, Lucarotti turned his Viking storyline into a short story for Doctor Who Magazine, entitled “Who Discovered America?”.
Characters: The First Doctor, Ian, Barbara, Vicki
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: After landing in 1002 Greenland, the time travellers are captured by Leif Eriksson and his Vikings. The Doctor needs some plutonic rock to repair the TARDIS, but knows that this can only be found in Newfoundland. He convinces Eriksson to lead an exploration party across the ocean. After acquiring the necessary minerals, he then takes Eriksson further on to Nova Scotia, where the Viking orders the time travellers to remain to help start a settlement. The Doctor uses the unusual tidal properties of the nearby Bay of Fundy to convince Eriksson that he is a magician, and the companions are returned to the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #184, DWM #233