Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (The Fourth Doctor)
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The Angarath The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Eric Pringle Notes: On August 11th, 1975, Pringle was commissioned for the first two episodes of “The Angarath” by producer Philip Hinchcliffe. These were delivered on September 27th, but after receiving no reply from the Doctor Who production office as to their suitability, Pringle eventually decided to complete the serial regardless, submitting the final two parts on March 10th, 1976. Hinchcliffe had no intention of proceeding further with the story, however, and the situation was finally dealt with on June 23rd. Several years later, Pringle would write The Awakening for Season Twenty-One.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a race of people offering human sacrifices to sentient rocks.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Beasts Of Manzic The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Robin Smyth Notes: This storyline was formally rejected on May 13th, 1975.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Castle Of Doom The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Fisher Notes: Fisher submitted this storyline to producer John Nathan-Turner on November 7th, 1979. Nathan-Turner rejected it in favour of developing The Leisure Hive.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Child Prodigy The Fourth Doctor
Writers: Alistair Beaton and Sarah Dunant Notes: Beaton -- a colleague of script editor Douglas Adams from his days as a comedy writer -- and Dunant were commissioned on December 12th, 1978. On January 9th, 1979, however, their scripts were rejected as being unacceptable.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned time loops or freezes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

The Dogs Of Darkness The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Jack Gardner Notes: Script editor Christopher H Bidmead commissioned this storyline from Gardner on March 29th, 1980. Subsequently, Gardner was asked to expand “The Dogs Of Darkness” into full scripts, but to replace the Fourth Doctor with the Fifth Doctor, as it was now being viewed as a possible adventure for Season Nineteen. The story was still under consideration by the end of April 1981, but was abandoned sometime thereafter.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; the revised version featured the Fifth Doctor, presumably with Adric, Nyssa and Tegan)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Eighteen and Nineteen
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

The Doomsday Contract The Fourth Doctor
aka Shylock
Writers: John Lloyd and Allan Prior Notes: Lloyd was a frequent collaborator with script editor Douglas Adams, who commissioned him to write “The Doomsday Contract” for Season Seventeen around late October 1978. Lloyd used ideas from an unfinished science-fiction novel called GiGax, and hewed to the comedic style Adams had established in The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy. After Lloyd submitted an extensive storyline for “The Doomsday Contract”, he was asked to rein in complex effects sequences and delete the Spondilas Chamber on the grounds that it was irrelevant to the plot. He also had to replace the Children of Pyxis, due to fears that child labour laws would make production difficult. Instead, he came up with a race of desert nomads-cum-mercenaries called the Wadifalayeen, although producer Graham Williams was worried that these new monsters would offend Muslims. Lloyd also recast the Plenum Trust as an altruistic conservation organisation, while the chairman of Cosmegalon was renamed Skorpios. On January 16th, 1979, however, Lloyd had to abandon “The Doomsday Contract” due to his new commitments as producer of Not The Nine O'Clock News. Still keen on the story, Adams secured Lloyd's permission for the storyline to be developed into full scripts by another writer. On February 7th he secured the services of Allan Prior, a playwright who had recently written for Blake's 7. Although Prior submitted his scripts on March 2nd, these were rejected. On August 15th, with his attention now turning to Season Eighteen, Adams again sought authorisation for another writer to be brought onto the project, which was now referred to as “Shylock”; the same permission was granted yet again on September 26th, by which time the title had reverted to “The Doomsday Contract”. However, no further development seems to have been undertaken, and with Adams' departure from Doctor Who at the end of November, it appears that “The Doomsday Contract” was dropped altogether.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Seventeen and Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: While vacationing on Cimmerian II, the Doctor is summoned before the Altribunal of Coelare Coelum, an intergalactic court. He has been called as a witness in a millennia-old case in which the Plenum Trust Corporation (whose Executive Vice President, Smilax, is an old friend) is opposing the purchase of the Earth by Cosmegalon and its unscrupulous owner, Jugend Bruisa. Plenum had been testing the Spondilas Chamber -- an incredibly powerful device capable of polymorphing matter -- when Cosmegalon bought the Earth via dubious means. Now Smilax fears that Chamber falling into Bruisa's hands. In court, the Doctor gives evidence that the Earth is home to intelligent life, which by law would nullify Cosmegalon's ownership. He is sent to Earth to retrieve a human as proof. Arriving in mediaeval Yorkshire, the Doctor is prevented from completing his task by the monstrous Children of Pyxis, who have been despatched by Cosmegalon. Fortunately, he is saved from death by the timely intervention of Smilax, and does manage to spirit away the Spondilas Chamber. Nonetheless, with the Doctor having seemingly failed, the court rules in Cosmegalon's favour. However, the Doctor tricks Bruisa and the Children of Pyxis into travelling to modern-day Earth near a missile base, where their ship is annihilated.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #218-219, DWM Special Edition #9

The Doppelgangers see Shield Of Zarak

Dragons Of Fear see Erinella

The Dreamers Of Phados The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: After “The Silent Scream” was rejected in early 1975, this was one of the storylines Boucher worked on with producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on a colony ship which has been home to a civilisation spanning many generations.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #229, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

Erinella The Fourth Doctor
aka Dragons Of Fear
Writer: Pennant Roberts Notes: Roberts, who had directed several stories (most recently The Pirate Planet), began working on “Dragons Of Fear” in the fall of 1978, drawing on elements of both Celtic folklore and the Welsh language. A script commission followed on January 10th, 1979, with a view to making it the fifth serial of Season Seventeen (the slot eventually occupied by The Horns Of Nimon). However, “Dragons Of Fear” would have to be an expensive production, and it soon became clear that the Doctor Who budget would not stretch to afford both it and City Of Death. The story was dropped around February, by which time it had been retitled “Erinella” (which roughly translates as “Another Ireland” in Gaelic). In January 1980, “Erinella” was recommissioned, with the intention of inserting it into Season Eighteen (possibly as the penultimate serial, since Roberts was told that he would have to replace Romana with new companion Adric). However, incoming script editor Christopher H Bidmead wanted to ground Doctor Who in more realistic science, which was at odds with the premise of “Erinella”. Bidmead suggested several major changes to the storyline, but by now Roberts was fatigued with the process, and disinterested in pursuing the project further. In the mid-Eighties, Roberts resubmitted “Erinella” to script editor Eric Saward, but nothing came of this.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9 (original submission; the resubmission replaced Romana and K·9 with Adric)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The fifth serial of Season Seventeen; Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The Doctor, Romana and K·9 arrive on the planet Erinella. There, the Doctor is immediately arrested and accused of poisoning a local noble. Indeed, everyone seems to recognise him, despite the fact that he's never been to Erinella before. Romana and K·9 retreat to the woods where they meet Og, the keeper of Erinella's dragons. Meanwhile, the Doctor discovers that the true murderer is a Queen who is scheming to control all of Erinella. Moreover, he has accidentally arrived on the planet later than he was meant to. He escapes and travels back in time to set in motion the events that he has already witnessed. Romana convinces Og to send the dragons against the Queen, while the Doctor tricks her into confessing her crimes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #248, DWM Special Edition #9

The Eyes Of Nemesis The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles submitted this storyline on May 16th, 1975. It was inspired in part by the legend of the Wandering Jew.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: On an alien planet, an old beggar named Lakdem is pursued by Myrron androids, but is immune to their destructive weaponry. The TARDIS materialises, and the Doctor is captured by the Myrron commander, Torr. Sarah takes Lakdem back to the TARDIS, where he sheds his skin to become a younger man. Together, they rescue the Doctor and Lakdem sets the coordinates to take to the TARDIS to his planet of origin, the secret world of Oinos. There, he reveals that he is also an android: one of Thirteen Watchers created by Death and infused with awesome power to wander the universe and observe its progress. However, Torr has tracked the TARDIS to Oinos and reveals that he serves the Celestial Toymaker, who desires Death's power for himself. The Doctor challenges the Toymaker, and the distraction allows Lakdem to accelerate time around the Myrrons, destroying them utterly.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

Farer Nohan The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Stephenson Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 18th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

Fires Of The Starmind The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: This was an unsolicited submission made to script editor Robert Holmes in late 1975. Holmes felt that it lacked action and drama, and was in need of a proper antagonist. Nonetheless, he thought that “Fires Of The Starmind” had more potential than most amateur submissions and encouraged Platt to continue writing. “Fires Of The Starmind” was rejected on December 15th, but after numerous attempts, Platt would finally earn a Doctor Who credit on Ghost Light in 1989.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane, Harry
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Complete(?) script
Synopsis: Information in the Time Lord libraries is stored on photons. A sentient star uses this as a means of invading Gallifrey.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #305

The Gaslight Murders The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Basil Dawson Notes: Dawson, a veteran screenwriter, was approached by script editor Robert Holmes to develop a story which would introduce a new companion to replace Sarah Jane Smith. The new character was a Cockney girl whom the Doctor would take under his wing and educate, in the manner of Eliza Doolittle in the George Bernard Shaw play Pygmalion. “The Gaslight Murders” was quickly abandoned, however. Its spot in the schedule was ultimately filled by The Face Of Evil, while Holmes reused the general framework in The Talons Of Weng-Chiang.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fourth story of Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Probably storyline
Synopsis: Involved murders in Victorian London.
References: Classic Who: The Hinchcliffe Years

The Haunting The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Terrance Dicks Notes: Dicks submitted this idea around the start of November 1974, and was commissioned to turn it into a storyline on December 11th. Early in 1975, however, the production team concluded that it was not what they wanted, and it was formally abandoned on May 13th. In the meantime, Dicks was contracted to write The Brain Of Morbius instead. Some elements of the “The Haunting” were reused for Dicks' abortive 1977 script “The Vampire Mutation”, which finally became the Season Eighteen serial State Of Decay.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved the Doctor confronting vampires.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

Into The Comet The Fourth Doctor
Writer: James Follett Notes: Follett was a novelist who pitched this idea circa September 1979, when it was rejected by script editor Douglas Adams. Follett resubmitted “Into The Comet” to new script editor Christopher H Bidmead around May 1980, but once again the storyline was not pursued.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved monsters attacking a race of beings who live inside Halley's Comet, unaware that there is anything beyond it.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Invasion Of The Veridians The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Nabil Shaban Notes: Shaban was a longtime fan of Doctor Who, and had previously suggested himself to replace the late Roger Delgado as the Master. In offering this script to the production office in 1980, Shaban also put himself forward as a potential successor to Tom Baker as the Doctor. Nothing came of “Invasion Of The Veridians”, but Shaban later played Sil in 1985's Vengeance On Varos and 1986's The Trial Of A Time Lord.
Characters: Presumably the Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Full(?) script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #309

The Killer Cats Of Geng Singh see Killers Of The Dark

Killers Of The Dark The Fourth Doctor
aka The Killer Cats Of Geng Singh
Writer: David Weir Notes: Producer Graham Williams was enamoured with the way the Time Lords had been developed in The Deadly Assassin, and wanted a Gallifrey-related story to close Season Fifteen. Script editor Anthony Read approached Weir, with whom he had worked on The Troubleshooters. The result, “Killers Of The Dark”, was commissioned on July 18th, 1977, and was influenced by Weir's interest in Oriental cultures. (The adventure may also have been known as “The Killer Cats Of Geng Singh” or some variation thereof, although this appears to have been a title made up by Williams after the fact.) A month later, however, both Read and director Gerald Blake determined that Weir's scripts were impossible to realise on Doctor Who's limited budget, boasting set pieces such as a stadium full of cat people. Reluctantly, “Killers Of The Dark” was abandoned in mid-August, leaving Williams and Read to hurriedly write The Invasion Of Time in its place.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Leela, K·9
Episodes: 6
Planned For: The sixth serial of Season Fifteen
Stage Reached: Complete(?) script
Synopsis: Concerned a race of cat people native to Gallifrey.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Winter Special 1992, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Krikkitmen The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Douglas Adams Notes: This was one of several ideas that Adams proposed to the production office around 1976. It was rejected by script editor Robert Holmes, who nonetheless encouraged Adams to continue submitting material; this ultimately led to his commission for The Pirate Planet. Later, in 1980, Adams revised “The Krikkitmen” for use by Paramount Pictures as a potential Doctor Who feature film, although nothing came of this project. Finally, Adams included many of the ideas from “The Krikkitmen” in his novel Life, The Universe And Everything, the second sequel to his fantastically popular The Hitch-Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Fifteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Two million years ago, the inhabitants of the planet Krikkit built a race of androids called the Krikkitmen to wipe out all life in the universe. They were stopped by the Time Lords, who trapped Krikkit within a temporal prison. Now, however, a group of Krikkitmen which escaped the Time Lords' sentence are trying to reassemble the components of a key which can free Krikkit -- components of which happen to resemble elements of the Earth game of cricket, itself actually a reflection of the ancient war. The Doctor and Sarah stumble upon this plot when they see the Krikkitmen steal the Ashes during a test match at Lords. They then travel to the planet Bethselamin to foil the next step in the Krikkitmen's quest.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #253, DWM Special Edition #9, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Lords Of Misrule The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Ted Willis Notes: One of the founding fathers of British television drama, Dixon Of Dock Green creator Willis had worked with Doctor Who script editor Anthony Read during the Sixties. Read commissioned Willis to write “The Lords Of Misrule” in late 1977 or early 1978, but it does not appear that it proceeded past the storyline stage. Its spot was eventually taken by The Power Of Kroll.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fifth story of Season Sixteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The people of the planet Tetran are enslaved by the cruel Shadowlords, who rule from an orbiting castle. The Shadowlords hunt their subjects using wolf-life Prowlers, and force them to duel one another. The Doctor discovers that the Tetrans are actually descended from the survivors of a crashed mining ship, while the Shadowlords are security robots, disguised and maddened due to their connection with the pilot, who is held on the brink of death by the vessel's computer. K·9 severs the pilot's link with the ship, deactivating the Shadowlords. The Doctor and Romana recover the fifth segment of the Key To Time, concealed as a massive crystal powering the Shadowlords' castle.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Summer Special 1995

The Lost Legion The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Douglas Camfield Notes: After directing The Seeds Of Doom for Season Thirteen, Camfield approached producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes about the possibility of writing a serial for the next block of episodes, as Camfield also had some scripting credits to his name. Holmes harboured doubts about the idea, but Hinchcliffe was enthusiastic and so “The Lost Legion” was commissioned on January 22nd, 1976. The story idea stemmed from Camfield's fascination with military history, and his admiration of the 1924 novel Beau Geste by PC Wren. By this point, Elisabeth Sladen had already indicated that she would be leaving Doctor Who after the second story of Season Fourteen, and so “The Lost Legion” was developed with the intention of dramatically writing Sarah Jane Smith out of the programme by killing her off. It was anticipated that Camfield would also direct his own serial. When he submitted his first script on February 9th, however, it did not meet Holmes' approval, and he began to groom The Hand Of Fear as a possible replacement. Camfield thereafter became increasingly late with his submissions, and “The Lost Legion” was taken off the schedule by the end of March. Camfield continued working on the story -- finally submitting the script for part four on September 24th -- but by this time the production team had no interest in developing it further.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Second serial of Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: An isolated North African outpost of the French Foreign Legion becomes the focal point of a confrontation between the Skarkel and the Khoorians, two factions of an alien race. At the story's conclusion, the last of the aliens shoots Sarah Jane as it dies, and she expires in the Doctor's arms. The Legionnaires build a funeral pyre for Sarah, which burns as the TARDIS dematerialises.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

Mark Of Lumos The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Keith Miles Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 14th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Menday Fault The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Wiltshire Notes: In late 1975 or early 1976, Wiltshire, a dentist and magazine editor, submitted a detailed but unsolicited storyline for “The Menday Fault” to the Doctor Who production office. The idea was not pursued.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Thirteen or Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and Sarah Jane join the crew of the Thor, an experimental nuclear submarine attempting to set a new depth record by entering the Fault of Menday in the Bermuda Triangle. The Fault turns out to be a passageway to a subterranean world, and the Thor is captured by a race called the Suranians, led by Zorr. The Suranians' world is lit by a glowing cloud of gas that is beginning to fade, and so Zorr wants to use the Polaris missiles aboard the Thor to invade the surface world. He threatens Sarah's life to force the Doctor's cooperation, but she is saved by Nephus, a merman-like Trelw. Nephus' people are being mind-controlled by the Suranians, but the Doctor manages to destroy the transmitter, inciting a rebellion. Nephus kills Zorr, and the Thor is able to the return to the surface world.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM Special Edition #8

The Mentor Conspiracy The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: After “The Silent Scream” was rejected in early 1975, this was one of the storylines Boucher worked on with producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes. It included the characters of Leela and Andor, who would eventually appear in The Face Of Evil. “The Mentor Conspiracy” underwent some development, but was ultimately turned down on October 30th, 1975.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Leela
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on a colony ship which has been home to a civilisation spanning many generations.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #229, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

Mouth Of Grath The Fourth Doctor
Writers: Malcolm Edwards and Leroy Kettle Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 18th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

Nightmare Planet The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Dennis Spooner Notes: Spooner's storyline commission came on January 31st, 1975, followed by a request for full scripts on February 4th. Script editor Robert Holmes became unhappy with the drugs element of Spooner's serial, and it was dropped.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a planet where the populace is unknowingly subjugated with drugs in their food and water. Misdeeds are punished with the temporary suppression of the drugs, which causes the people to see terrible monsters all around them.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies, The Doctors: 30 Years Of Time Travel

The Prisoner Of Time The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Barry Letts Notes: Letts was commissioned to write this storyline on January 21st, 1975, exactly one day before he was contracted to direct The Android Invasion. Letts based “The Prisoner Of Time” on the audition piece he had written for the purpose of casting the role of Sarah Jane Smith in 1973. Although scripts were subsequently requested, producer Philip Hinchcliffe was unhappy with Letts' initial draft of episode one, demanding numerous alterations. Letts was unable to come up with a revised version which was acceptable to the production team, and “The Prisoner Of Time” was abandoned.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Psychonauts The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Fisher Notes: Fisher discussed this idea with script editor Douglas Adams shortly before Adams left Doctor Who in late 1979. The name Nephilim was drawn from the Old Testament and from various Jewish writings, where it refers to a kind of demon. “The Psychonauts” was not taken forward by new producer John Nathan-Turner, who instead asked Fisher to develop The Leisure Hive.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor battles the Nephilim, creatures who travel through time in sleeping units shaped like sarcophagi.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Psychrons The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Terence Greer Notes: This storyline was commissioned on June 13th, 1980. It was finally rejected sometime after April 1981, but it is not known if the idea's development extended to the point that Greer modified it to include the Fifth Doctor.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; possibly later the Fifth Doctor)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Return To Sukannan The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Terry Nation Notes: Nation was contracted to provide the storyline for “Return To Sukannan” on February 13th, 1975. It was not taken further, and was presumably dropped when it was decided that Nation should expand The Android Invasion into full scripts.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

Romanoids The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Geoff Lowe Notes: Lowe offered this idea to script editor Christopher H Bidmead around the summer of 1980. On December 9th, Bidmead submitted the proposal to producer John Nathan-Turner for his consideration, but it was not developed further. (It is not known if the development of “Romanoids” took into account Tom Baker's decision to leave Doctor Who at the end of Season Eighteen.)
Characters: The Fourth Doctor or the Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

Sealed Orders The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Christopher Priest Notes: Priest originally began devising this idea with script editor Douglas Adams around October 1978. Little progress was made, but it was revived when Priest was independently approached by Adams' successor, Christopher H Bidmead, who was a fan of Priest's novels; they decided to resurrect “Sealed Orders”. A storyline was commissioned on February 27th, 1980, followed by full scripts on March 24th. By this time, “Sealed Orders” was planned to conclude a trilogy of stories set in the pocket universe of E-Space, and would feature the departures of Romana and K·9. However, Priest was not accustomed to writing for television, and it became clear that his scripts were not suitable for production. Bidmead provided the author with heavily-edited samples as guidance for what he wanted, but Priest objected to these, and their relationship deteriorated. Priest stopped working on “Sealed Orders” in April, and Warriors' Gate took its place. “Sealed Orders” was formally abandoned in June, although Bidmead and producer John Nathan-Turner still hoped that it could be revisited in the future.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9, Adric
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fifth story of Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: A political thriller set on Gallifrey in which the Doctor is seemingly ordered to kill Romana by the Time Lords. A complex plot involving time paradoxes would result in the appearance of a second Doctor (who dies) and lead to Romana's departure; it also involved the idea of time running into itself, resulting in one TARDIS existing inside another.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM #315, DWM Special Edition #9

The Sea Of Fear The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles submitted this storyline on March 9th, 1974, after completing work on The Monster Of Peladon.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twelve
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on an island where the ape-like Simiads and the amphibious Zelons are at war. The conflict is being provoked by technicians from Research Inc under the command of Director Korbyn. Research Inc has travelled back in time from Earth City in the far future in order to determine which of the two races is an ancestor of Man. Once this is known, any denizens of Earth City who manifest the other race's lineage will be purged under the orders of the Great Leader. But the Great Leader knows that he is of Simiad strain and has planted an agent, Dr Rojel, amongst the Research Inc staff to tip the scales against the Zelons. However, the Doctor discovers that pollution from the Research Inc facility is having a degenerative effect on the Simiads -- which Korbyn tries to cover up by activing a self-destruct mechanism. The Doctor stops him by using the TARDIS to scramble the signal, and reveals that the Simiads and Zelons are actually two forms of the same race.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Secret Of Cassius The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: Although “The Secret Of Cassius” was rejected by script editor Anthony Read in August 1978, Read encouraged Smith to continue writing. Read was unaware that Smith was a Doctor Who fan in his mid-teens, but this eventually led to Smith's commission for Full Circle eighteen months later.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Shield Of Zarak The Fourth Doctor
aka The Doppelgangers, Shield Of Zareg
Writer: Ted Lewis Notes: Lewis, whose novel Jack's Return Home was filmed as the 1971 Michael Caine hit Get Carter, had worked with Doctor Who producer Graham Williams on Z Cars. Williams was eager to bring Lewis onto Doctor Who, and so “The Doppelgangers” was commissioned in storyline form on January 7th, 1978, and as full scripts as “Shield Of Zarak” on February 24th. However, Lewis was not well-acquainted with Doctor Who, and as his scripts began to arrive in late April, it was clear that they needed work. Sadly, Lewis had begun a descent into alcoholism amidst marital difficulties, and was drunk when he met with Williams and script editor Anthony Read to discuss “Shield Of Zarak” (which may also have gone by “Shield Of Zareg”). By the middle of May, the serial had been abandoned, and was ultimately replaced by The Androids Of Tara; it was formally rejected on January 11th, 1979. Lewis never worked for the BBC again.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fourth story of Season Sixteen
Stage Reached: Partial script
Synopsis: Dealt with the notion that legendary heroes might, in reality, have been the antithesis of the way history would ultimately portray them. Apparently, the specific example planned was to have the Doctor and Romana encounter Robin Hood in their search for the fourth segment of the Key To Time, only to discover that the alleged hero was actually a blackhearted villain.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Shield Of Zareg see Shield Of Zarak

Shylock see The Doomsday Contract

The Silent Scream The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: This was an unsolicted submission made by Boucher to the production office in early 1975. It was not felt to be suitable for Doctor Who, but encouraged producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes to work with Boucher on further ideas.
Characters: Presumably the Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

Soldar And The Plastoids The Fourth Doctor
Writer: John Bennett Notes: Bennett's storyline was commissioned on April 10th, 1980. It may have been intended for Season Nineteen only; at this point, Tom Baker had not yet decided to leave Doctor Who.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen (possibly also Season Eighteen)
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Song Of The Space Whale The Fourth 
Doctor The Fifth 
Doctor The Sixth 
Doctor
aka The Space Whale, Space-Whale
Writers: Pat Mills and John Wagner Notes: Mills and Wagner were writing comics for Doctor Who Weekly when they devised this concept. Mills' wife, Angie, felt that it was too good for the comic, and should be offered to the Doctor Who production team instead. Although Wagner was skeptical, it was submitted in late 1980, alongside three other ideas Mills had conceived. The storyline was commissioned on September 9th, 1981 under the title “Space-Whale” (which saw the Fourth Doctor replaced by the Fifth), followed by the full scripts on December 2nd as “The Song Of The Space Whale”. Around this time, Wagner decided that he was not interested in remaining on the project, and Mills forged ahead alone. It was decided that “The Song Of The Space Whale” would be the introductory story for new companion Turlough. He replaced Rina's original boyfriend, John, and would now leave with the Doctor instead of Rina because he claims that space travel is in his blood. Soon thereafter, however, the scripts ran into problems when script editor Eric Saward objected to Mills' working-class depiction of Greeg, and his portrayal of the castaways as a colony of mystics. The writer was unable to develop an alternative which was acceptable to Saward, and so “The Song Of The Space Whale” was replaced by Mawdryn Undead. Mills and Saward continued to work on the scripts -- now simply called “The Space Whale” -- and Mills eventually replacing the castaways with a marooned family. The Sixth Doctor and Peri became the main characters, and the scripts were rewritten as two forty-five minute episodes in accordance with the new format for Season Twenty-Two. Saward continued to have misgivings about the serial, however, and around the middle of May 1984, “The Space Whale” was replaced in the schedule by Vengeance On Varos. It appears that further development of Mills' scripts was undertaken, but they were finally abandoned around July 1985. Mills later wrote an audio adaptation of his story, released as “Song Of The Megaptera” by Big Finish Productions in May 2010.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission); the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan (revised version); the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan, Turlough (second revision); the Sixth Doctor, Peri (third revision)
Episodes: 4 (2 45-minute episodes, third revision)
Planned For: Third story of Season Twenty; second story of Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS is captured by Captain Greeg of the spaceship Orkas when the Doctor interferes with his attempts to hunt a massive Ghaleen -- a “space whale” with the ability to travel in time. Also on the Orkas are Krakos, an alien Tuthon who wants to steal the orb which powers the Ghaleen's time travel, and Rina, who believes that a community of castaways is living in the belly of the Ghaleen, and who has stowed away aboard Greeg's vessel in the hope of rescuing them. In fact, the castaways have constructed a “raft-ship” which would permit them to escape, but their leader, Waldron, has not disclosed the fact that the device works, because he believes that by remaining within the Ghaleen, they are living a life safe from the outside universe. Krakos succeeds in seizing the orb, however, causing temporal energy -- which induces “time necrosis” -- to flood out of the Ghaleen. The Doctor uses the raft-ship to reverse the damage, and Krakos is killed trying to escape the Ghaleen's belly. The castaways are rescued, but Waldron has been inside the Ghaleen for so long that when he attempts to leave, he dies of time necrosis. Greeg is overthrown by his second-in-command, Stennar, and the Ghaleen is allowed to return to its pod.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 228, 229, DWM Special Edition #s 1, 3, 9, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Space Station The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Christopher Langley Notes: Langley's storyline was submitted on December 30th, 1973, and he was commissioned on January 24th, 1974. Season Twelve was largely constructed around “Space Station”, with Revenge Of The Cybermen designed to use the same sets and The Sontaran Experiment intended to continue the story thread of Earth's abandonment by humanity. “Space Station” and The Sontaran Experiment would also have been made as essentially one large recording block -- since the former was entirely confined to the studio and the latter would be made only on location -- sharing the same director and crew. Around late May, however, it was clear that Langley's scripts were unacceptable, and the decision was made to replace “Space Station” with The Ark In Space. “Space Station” was officially dropped on June 17th.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane, Harry
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Second story of Season Twelve
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Apparently set on a far-future space station during a period when mankind is no longer living on Earth.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Space Whale see The Song Of The Space Whale

Space-Whale see The Song Of The Space Whale

The Tearing Of The Veil The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Alan Drury Notes: Drury was commissioned by script editor Douglas Adams on April 2nd, 1979. He delivered his first two scripts in early May, at which point it was decided that “The Tearing Of The Veil” was not working out. Nonetheless, Adams continued to discuss the story with Drury over the summer, and by September 19th an acceptable draft had been completed. “The Tearing Of The Veil” was then passed to Adams' successor, Christopher H Bidmead, for possible use in Season Eighteen. However, Bidmead disliked the whimsical science-fiction favoured by Adams, and since Drury's story was in line with this approach, it was discarded by the new production team.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Seventeen and Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: An evil force pursues the TARDIS to a Victorian vicarage, where the vicar's widow is being defrauded by phoney spiritualists. As supernatural phenomena grip the vicarage, the con artists are killed off one by one. Even K·9 is apparently torn apart by a poltergeist, while much of the Doctor's life force is drained from him, turning him into a disinterested crank wandering about in his nightgown.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM Special Edition #9

Valley Of The Lost The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Philip Hinchcliffe Notes: Hinchcliffe submitted “Valley Of The Lost” around November 1978. It was rejected on January 3rd, 1979, both on the grounds of cost and because other stories under consideration at the same time (including The Armageddon Factor and “Child Prodigy”) also dealt with frozen-time concepts.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and Romana travel to the jungles of Brazil, where they come upon a Luron scout ship which crashlanded in 1870. The vessel emits a bubble of time which has kept the surroundings preserved as they were then -- including a lost city of gold, inhabited by Maygor savages who worship the only Luron survivor, Godrin, as their deity. Godrin convinces the Doctor to bring him to London, but once there uses modern technology to send a signal to the Luron fleet to commence an invasion of Earth. The Doctor and Romana manage to infiltrate the Luron mothership and take control of its power source. Faced with destruction, the Lurons agree to abandon their invasion.
References: Doctor Who Yearbook 1996, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

(untitled) The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Douglas Adams Notes: Adams submitted this idea around the middle of 1974. He later reused elements of it in his hugely successful 1978 radio series The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy and its myriad adaptations into other media.
Characters: Presumably the Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twelve
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Included a spaceship called the ‘B’ Ark leaving Earth with the affluent but useless members of society aboard.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

(untitled) The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Douglas Adams Notes: Adams had apparently toyed with this idea for a while, and when a final story was needed for Season Seventeen (for which he served as script editor), he suggested expanding it into a six-part serial. Producer Graham Williams nixed the idea, however, which he thought would be seen as mocking Doctor Who. Instead, Adams developed the abortive Shada.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 2
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Fed up with saving the universe, the Doctor goes into retirement, but is constantly summoned back from seclusion to resolve various troubles.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267

(untitled) The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: Boucher began discussions with the production team about a new serial shortly after completing Image Of The Fendahl. However, by this time Boucher was script editing science-fiction series Blake's 7, and BBC Head of Drama Ronnie Marsh did not want writers contributing to both shows. Consequently, Boucher's Doctor Who story did not proceed further.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Sixteen
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Involved a remote Earth outpost under attack.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #197

(untitled) The Fourth Doctor
Writer: John Brosnan Notes: Shortly after becoming Doctor Who's script editor in January 1980, Christopher H Bidmead appealed to serious science-fiction authors to submit ideas for Doctor Who. Brosnan, who at the time was writing for genre magazine Starburst and would later pen more than a dozen novels, subsequently contacted Bidmead with this unusual suggestion, but it was not pursued.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor lands at BBC Television Centre, where he meets Tom Baker -- the actor who plays him on television -- and the two work together to combat a threat.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

(untitled) The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Robert Holmes Notes: In the autumn of 1976, it appeared that the team of producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes would continue to guide Doctor Who during Season Fifteen. One of the stories they considered at this time was a Holmes-written serial inspired by Joseph Conrad's 1899 novel Heart Of Darkness. These plans were scuppered in late October when the BBC decided to instead replace Hinchcliffe with Graham Williams.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Leela
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Fifteen
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

(untitled) The Fourth Doctor
Writers: Pat Mills and John Wagner Notes: This was submitted around the start of 1979, but was not taken forward. Wagner and Mills subsequently reworked it as Doctor Who and The Iron Legion, their first comic strip for Doctor Who Weekly, published in issues one to eight from October 1979. The artwork was by Dave Gibbons, who later rose to fame as the illustrator of the seminal comic book miniseries Watchmen.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set in a parallel universe where the Roman Empire persisted into the present day.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9