Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (The Fifth Doctor)
The First Doctor The Second Doctor The Third Doctor The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor The Sixth Doctor The Seventh Doctor The Eighth Doctor The Ninth Doctor The Tenth Doctor The Eleventh Doctor

The Children Of Seth see Manpower

Children's Seth see Manpower

Circus Of Destiny The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Ben Steed Notes: Steed delivered his storyline in January 1983, but it was not taken forward.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: 2
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Darkness The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Eric Pringle Notes: This idea was submitted in August 1981 alongside The Awakening, but only the latter was developed further.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: May have involved the Daleks.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #282

The Dark Samurai The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: This was an unsolicited submission to the Doctor Who production office circa 1983 from the writer of Full Circle. Script editor Eric Saward was impressed enough to commission “The First Sontarans”.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set in Japan in the early nineteenth century.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432

The Dogs Of Darkness The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Jack Gardner Notes: Script editor Christopher H Bidmead commissioned this storyline from Gardner on March 29th, 1980. Subsequently, Gardner was asked to expand “The Dogs Of Darkness” into full scripts, but to replace the Fourth Doctor with the Fifth Doctor, as it was now being viewed as a possible adventure for Season Nineteen. The story was still under consideration by the end of April 1981, but was abandoned sometime thereafter.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; the revised version featured the Fifth Doctor, presumably with Adric, Nyssa and Tegan)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Eighteen and Nineteen
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

The Elite The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg submitted this idea in late 1982 after completing Enlightenment, but it was not pursued. In October 2011, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation “The Elite” by John Dorney.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands in a city embroiled in a protracted war. Most of the population is very young, and has been bred for intelligence to give them a strategic advantage. Appalled, the Doctor is branded a war criminal but saved by the twelve year-old General Aubron. They join forces with savages on the surface of the planet who turn out to be people banished from the city because they were not sufficiently intelligent. Together, they assault the bunker of the ruling High Priest. The High Priest turns out to be a Dalek who crashlanded on the planet centuries earlier, and who has been manipulating the society to elevate them to the point where they will make it possible for the Dalek to return to Skaro.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267, DWM Special Edition #3

The Enemy Within The 
Fifth Doctor
Writer: Christopher Priest Notes: To make up for the rejection of “Sealed Orders”, which had been abandoned in June 1980, Priest was commissioned to storyline “The Enemy Within” on December 5th of that year. By the time full scripts were requested on February 6th, 1981, it had been decided that Priest's serial would culminate in the death of Adric, whom producer John Nathan-Turner felt was not working out as a companion. Around the middle of June, a disagreement about rewrite fees and a vitriolic exchange with Nathan-Turner led to Priest's refusal to perform requested rewrites on “The Enemy Within”. It was hastily replaced by Earthshock, while Priest's scripts were formally abandoned on July 17th.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The sixth serial of Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a monster at the heart of the TARDIS which embodies the Doctor's deepest fears. The story featured characters called Timewrights, and ended with Adric's demise.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #239, DWM #292, DWM Special Edition #1

Genesis Of The Cybermen The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Gerry Davis Notes: Former Doctor Who script editor Davis submitted this idea circa early 1981, intending it to be a prequel to his and Kit Pedler's original Cyberman serial, The Tenth Planet (which also featured Cyberman Krail). Davis wrote his storyline with only the Doctor and one female companion in mind; he called this character “Felicity” rather than writing with any particular companion in mind. Producer John Nathan-Turner and script editor Antony Root were not interested in “Genesis Of The Cybermen”.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Probably Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and his companion “Felicity” arrive on the planet Mondas, Earth's twin orbiting on the opposite side of the Sun. While the Doctor works on a piece of TARDIS equipment, Felicity encounters the gentle Prince Sylvan. Sylvan accidentally activates the TARDIS, sending him, the Doctor and Felicity fifty years into the future. There, Sylvan's brother, Dega, is now king and has used the Doctor's device to begin turning his people into Cybermen. He has constructed a space fleet with which he intends to invade the mineral-rich Earth, and plans to kill any unconverted Mondans with cyanide gas. Felicity appeals to Dega's partly-Cybernised wife, Queen Meta, and she shoots her husband dead -- only to be killed by Dega's chief of staff, Krail. In the confusion, Sylvan and a band of Mondan rebels flee in the spaceships to Earth; the massive concussion of take-off knocks Mondas out of its orbit into deep space.
References: Doctor Who: Cybermen, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Ghost Planet The Fifth Doctor The Sixth 
Doctor
Writer: Robin Squire Notes: Squire was commissioned to write a storyline for “Ghost Planet” on January 5th, 1983, followed by full scripts on May 20th.
Characters: The Fifth or Sixth Doctors
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One or Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: At least partial script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, DWM Special Edition #3, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Hebos The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Rod Beacham Notes: Beacham, an actor/writer who had played Corporal Lane in The Web Of Fear, was commissioned to write this storyline on December 5th, 1980. It was still being considered in April 1981, but was ultimately not pursued.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Hex The Fifth Doctor The Sixth Doctor
Writers: Peter Ling and Hazel Adair Notes: Ling (who had written Season Five's The Mind Robber) and Adair had cocreated the mid-Sixties soap opera Compact. In 1982, Doctor Who producer John Nathan-Turner began developing a relaunched version of Compact with Ling and Adair, called Impact. He hoped to leave Doctor Who to produce Impact, but when the project was shelved by the BBC, Nathan-Turner offered Ling and Adair a Doctor Who assignment as consolation. They were inspired to write “Hex” after observing some beehives that Adair had been asked to keep in her orchard. They also wanted to take advantage of the Fifth Doctor's youthful apparance by including a quasi-romantic subplot for the Time Lord. The storyline for “Hex” was commissioned on July 12th, 1983. Nathan-Turner liked the submission, but script editor Eric Saward grew gradually less impressed as work on “Hex” progressed. The story evolved from a six-part to a four-part version, and was then adapted as two 45-minute episodes for Season Twenty-Two, before finally being dropped. In November 2011, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “Hex” by Paul Finch under the title “Hexagora”.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor (original version), the Sixth Doctor (later version), Peri
Episodes: 6 (original version), 4 (revised version), 2 (45-minute; final version)
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-One and Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Earth's most brilliant minds are being kidnapped, and the Doctor traces the disappearances to the planet Hexagora. Confronting Queen Zafia, the Doctor learns that Hexagora is spiralling away from its sun, and the Hexagoran civilisation risks destruction. She claims that the kidnappings are intended to provide them with the brainpower to find a solution to the dilemma. The Doctor offers to help move the Hexagorans to an uninhabited planet, but Zafia will agree to this plan only if the Doctor agrees to a “marriage of state”. However, Peri discovers that the Hexagorans are actually bee-like creatures who are transforming themselves into clones of the kidnapped humans. Their plan is to infiltrate Earth, but Zafia will first absorb all of the Doctor's knowledge when they are married. A renegade Hexagoran named Jezz sets fire to the Hexagoran hives, and the Doctor and Peri grimly rescue the abducted humans while Hexagora burns.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 213, 214, DWM Special Edition #3

The House That Ur-Cjak Built The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Stephenson Notes: A storyline was commissioned on June 10th, after which Stephenson's idea was apparently abandoned.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Incident On Zeta Minor see Project Zeta-Sigma

The Macro Men The Fifth 
Doctor The Sixth 
Doctor
aka The Macros
Writers: Ingrid Pitt and Tony Rudlin Notes: Pitt had just appeared in Season Twenty-One's Warriors Of The Deep when she and her husband, Rudlin, submitted several story ideas to the Doctor Who production office. Of those, only “The Macro Men” -- inspired by the 1979 conspiracy theory text The Philadelphia Experiment: Project Invisibility by William L Moore and Charles Berlitz -- seems to have been pursued. This was conceived as a Fifth Doctor story, but was refashioned for the Sixth Doctor by the time the script for the first episode was commissioned on January 19th, 1984. During the drafting stage, the adventure's title was amended to “The Macros”, but although Pitt and Rudlin worked closely with script editor Eric Saward, the project did not proceed further. Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Macros” in June 2010.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor (original version), the Sixth Doctor (later version), Peri
Episodes: 4 (original version), 2 (45-minute; revised version)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Macros see The Macro Men

Manpower The Fifth 
Doctor The Sixth 
Doctor
aka May Time, Children's Seth, The Children Of Seth
Writer: Christopher Bailey Notes: After Bailey completed work on Snakedance, he was commissioned to write a storyline called “May Time” on August 24th, 1982. Full scripts were then requested on September 16th, by which time the adventure had become known as “Manpower”. This was apparently dropped, but on August 15th, 1983, Bailey was commissioned to write a set of scripts for the Sixth Doctor entitled “The Children Of Seth” (originally given the apparently erroneous title “Children's Seth”), which he recalls as being a revised version of “Manpower”. By this time, Doctor Who was in the process of shifting from 25-minute to 45-minute episodes. Bailey had trouble devising a structure for his story, and found himself unable to come up with an appropriate nemesis for the Doctor. Disillusioned by the lack of collaboration he was receiving from the Doctor Who production office, Bailey decided to withdraw from the television industry. In December 2011, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Children Of Seth” by Marc Platt.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, presumably with Tegan and Turlough (original submission); the Sixth Doctor and Peri (resubmission)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-One and Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 227, 327, DWM Special Edition #s 1, 3, Doctor Who: The Eighties

May Time see Manpower

The Metraki The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: This was an unsolicited submission to the Doctor Who production office circa 1983 from the writer of Full Circle. Script editor Eric Saward was impressed enough to commission “The First Sontarans”.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432

Nightmare Country The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Stephen Gallagher Notes: Gallagher submitted this storyline in late 1982, after finishing work on Season Twenty's Terminus. It was rejected on grounds of cost.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor agrees to let a race of beings called the Engineers make some repairs to the TARDIS. In return, he offers himself as a test subject for a Reality Simulator, constructed by a Master Engineer called Konis. The simulation is intended to be benign, but the Doctor finds himself amnesiac on a graveyard-like world overrun by the sinister Vodyani. In the TARDIS, Tegan and Turlough learn that the Reality Simulator actually generates a genuine alternate reality. Tegan enters the Simulator and frees the Doctor, but the Vodyani have found a way out of the machine as well. It transpires that the Vodyani were accidentally created by the mind of Konis' apprentice, Volos, who is now merging with the Vodyani leader. Volos sacrifices himself to stop the Vodyani, and Konis destroys the Reality Simulator.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #296, DWM Special Edition #3

Parasites The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Bill Lyons Notes: Lyons, who had written for Blake's 7, was commissioned to provide a storyline for “Parasites” (also referred to as “The Parasites”) on September 22nd, 1981. Scripts were commissioned on February 16th and April 23rd, 1982, but the story ultimately went unmade.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan (presumably with Nyssa and/or Turlough)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty or Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Place Where All Times Meet The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Colin Davis Notes: A storyline was commissioned from Davis -- who had written for Blake's 7 -- on June 10th, 1982. Davis' idea was apparently not pursued beyond this point.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Poison The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Rod Beacham Notes: Beacham was commissioned to write a storyline for “Poison” on April 27th, 1982, with full scripts contracted exactly a month later, on May 27th.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Project “4G” see Project Zeta-Sigma

Project Zeta Plus see Project Zeta-Sigma

Project Zeta-Sigma The Fifth Doctor
aka Project “4G”, Project Zeta Plus, Zeta Plus One, Incident On Zeta Minor
Writers: John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch Notes: After completing Meglos, Flanagan and McCulloch began developing “Project ‘4G’”, which was commissioned as a storyline on August 15th, 1980. The writers envisioned the new adventure as a parable on nuclear disarmament, with the detente between the Hawks and the Doves serving as a parallel for the Cold War. Around this time, it was decided that “Project ‘4G’” would be the first story for the Fifth Doctor, and hence the concluding part of a trilogy of adventures featuring the Master. Flanagan and McCulloch were asked to incorporate the Master into their plot, and it was decided that he would replace Sergo, and orchestrate the situation between the Hawks and the Doves in order to take over the solar system. The scripts were commissioned on October 7th; shortly thereafter, the title was changed to “Project Zeta Plus”. By early 1981, the story had become “Project Zeta-Sigma”, but concerns were mounting over scenes such as one involving a room full of invisible people. On February 19th, the decision was made to drop “Project Zeta-Sigma” from the production schedule. Consideration may have been given to deferring it to be made second (after Four To Doomsday), but ultimately Castrovalva was developed as the new season premiere. It was thought that “Project Zeta-Sigma” might be reworked to serve as the Season Nineteen finale, but this slot was taken by Time-Flight.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: First (later seventh) story of Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Two hostile planets are verging on war after one planet -- that of the Doves -- establishes an impregnable defense shield. In retaliation, the planet of the Hawks threatens to fire a super-missile which will destroy their solar system's sun and annihilate both worlds. This maneuver is advocated by Sergo, the Hawks' chief scientist, who secretly wants to use the political instability to allow the Hawk scientists to become the new ruling power. The Doctor is too late to prevent the Hawks' missile from being launched, but convinces both planets to fire their entire nuclear arsenals after it, in the hope of destroying the missile. These melt in proximity to the sun, but the missile fails to detonate anyway. It turns out that this was the Doctor's plan all along, and by engineering the destruction of the Hawks' and Doves' nuclear stockpiles, he has incited a new concordance between the two peoples.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #258, DWM Special Edition #1, DWM Special Edition #9

Psychrons The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Terence Greer Notes: This storyline was commissioned on June 13th, 1980. It was finally rejected sometime after April 1981, but it is not known if the idea's development extended to the point that Greer modified it to include the Fifth Doctor.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; possibly later the Fifth Doctor)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

The Rogue TARDIS The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg submitted this idea in late 1982 after completing Enlightenment, but it was not pursued.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Time Lords ask the Doctor to find a missing Time Lord named Ajon. Locating Ajon's TARDIS, the Doctor discovers it transformed into a nightmare world where cause follows effect. Eventually, it emerges that Ajon is half-human and, in response to the suppression of his human characteristics, has regenerated into a computer which is corrupting his TARDIS. The Doctor induces Ajon to regenerate again, ending the terror.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267, DWM Special Edition #3

Romanoids The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Geoff Lowe Notes: Lowe offered this idea to script editor Christopher H Bidmead around the summer of 1980. On December 9th, Bidmead submitted the proposal to producer John Nathan-Turner for his consideration, but it was not developed further. (It is not known if the development of “Romanoids” took into account Tom Baker's decision to leave Doctor Who at the end of Season Eighteen.)
Characters: The Fourth Doctor or the Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The SCI The Fifth Doctor
Writer: William Emms Notes: This was offered to the production office around 1983.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved the people of the planet Alden falling under mental domination.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Six Doctors The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Robert Holmes Notes: Holmes' involvement in Doctor Who's twentieth-anniversary special was encouraged by script editor Eric Saward, despite producer John Nathan-Turner's preference to avoid using writers associated with the programme's past. Holmes was skeptical that a good story could be written which would involve all five Doctors, plus their companions, as well as the Master and the Cybermen, but agreed to develop a suitable storyline, commissioned on August 2nd, 1982. He came up with three ideas, the first of which he was told to develop as “The Six Doctors”. (The cyborg element in this version was introduced to account for the absence of William Hartnell, the First Doctor, who had died in 1975.) One of Holmes' alternatives followed the same basic plot, but saw the Cybermen's surgeries cause the Fifth Doctor to regress back through his past incarnations; Holmes was dubious about including other companions in this scenario. A second, less well-formed idea, involved the TARDIS itself conjuring images of former Doctors and companions to help the current Doctor battle an ancient supercomputer. (Holmes was unsure how to involve the Cybermen in this version.) By the autumn, however, it became clear to Saward that Holmes was making little headway with “The Six Doctors”, and asked former script editor Terrance Dicks to prepare a back-up storyline. Holmes formally withdrew from the anniversary special on October 13th, although his renewed contact with the production office did lead to a commission for Season Twenty-One's The Caves Of Androzani. Elements of his ideas for “The Six Doctors” were later reused in Season Twenty-Two's The Two Doctors.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, the Fourth Doctor, the Third Doctor, the Second Doctor, Tegan, Jamie, Susan
Episodes: 1 (90 minutes)
Planned For: Between Seasons Twenty and Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Partial script
Synopsis: The Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Doctors (with their companions, including Jamie and Tegan) are drawn to the planet Maladoom, where they meet the First Doctor and Susan. They are trapped by the Master, who is working for the Cybermen. The Cybermen want to isolate the genetic component which permits Time Lords to travel freely in time and space; they will incorporate this factor into their own biology and conquer the time vortex. The Doctors manage to escape, but the First Doctor and Susan are really cyborgs created by the Cybermen. The other Doctors manage to destroy the duplicates and discover that it is the Master's TARDIS which has brought them to Maladoom. It is now operating out of control and threatens the universe, but the Doctors are able to deactivate it and return to their proper places in the timeline.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #313, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The Fifth Doctor

The Song Of The Space Whale The Fourth 
Doctor The Fifth 
Doctor The Sixth 
Doctor
aka The Space Whale, Space-Whale
Writers: Pat Mills and John Wagner Notes: Mills and Wagner were writing comics for Doctor Who Weekly when they devised this concept. Mills' wife, Angie, felt that it was too good for the comic, and should be offered to the Doctor Who production team instead. Although Wagner was skeptical, it was submitted in late 1980, alongside three other ideas Mills had conceived. The storyline was commissioned on September 9th, 1981 under the title “Space-Whale” (which saw the Fourth Doctor replaced by the Fifth), followed by the full scripts on December 2nd as “The Song Of The Space Whale”. Around this time, Wagner decided that he was not interested in remaining on the project, and Mills forged ahead alone. It was decided that “The Song Of The Space Whale” would be the introductory story for new companion Turlough. He replaced Rina's original boyfriend, John, and would now leave with the Doctor instead of Rina because he claims that space travel is in his blood. Soon thereafter, however, the scripts ran into problems when script editor Eric Saward objected to Mills' working-class depiction of Greeg, and his portrayal of the castaways as a colony of mystics. The writer was unable to develop an alternative which was acceptable to Saward, and so “The Song Of The Space Whale” was replaced by Mawdryn Undead. Mills and Saward continued to work on the scripts -- now simply called “The Space Whale” -- and Mills eventually replacing the castaways with a marooned family. The Sixth Doctor and Peri became the main characters, and the scripts were rewritten as two forty-five minute episodes in accordance with the new format for Season Twenty-Two. Saward continued to have misgivings about the serial, however, and around the middle of May 1984, “The Space Whale” was replaced in the schedule by Vengeance On Varos. It appears that further development of Mills' scripts was undertaken, but they were finally abandoned around July 1985. Mills later wrote an audio adaptation of his story, released as “Song Of The Megaptera” by Big Finish Productions in May 2010.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission); the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan (revised version); the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan, Turlough (second revision); the Sixth Doctor, Peri (third revision)
Episodes: 4 (2 45-minute episodes, third revision)
Planned For: Third story of Season Twenty; second story of Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS is captured by Captain Greeg of the spaceship Orkas when the Doctor interferes with his attempts to hunt a massive Ghaleen -- a “space whale” with the ability to travel in time. Also on the Orkas are Krakos, an alien Tuthon who wants to steal the orb which powers the Ghaleen's time travel, and Rina, who believes that a community of castaways is living in the belly of the Ghaleen, and who has stowed away aboard Greeg's vessel in the hope of rescuing them. In fact, the castaways have constructed a “raft-ship” which would permit them to escape, but their leader, Waldron, has not disclosed the fact that the device works, because he believes that by remaining within the Ghaleen, they are living a life safe from the outside universe. Krakos succeeds in seizing the orb, however, causing temporal energy -- which induces “time necrosis” -- to flood out of the Ghaleen. The Doctor uses the raft-ship to reverse the damage, and Krakos is killed trying to escape the Ghaleen's belly. The castaways are rescued, but Waldron has been inside the Ghaleen for so long that when he attempts to leave, he dies of time necrosis. Greeg is overthrown by his second-in-command, Stennar, and the Ghaleen is allowed to return to its pod.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 228, 229, DWM Special Edition #s 1, 3, 9, Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Space Whale see The Song Of The Space Whale

Space-Whale see The Song Of The Space Whale

The Torson Triumvirate The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: Smith, who had recently completed Full Circle, was commissioned to provide a storyline on November 25th, 1980. This was submitted on December 9th and was still being considered in April 1981, but was ultimately not pursued.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on present-day Earth.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432, DWM Special Edition #9

The Underworld The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg submitted this idea in late 1982 after completing Enlightenment, but it was not pursued. Several elements of the storyline were inspired by Greek mythology. The Hadeans were a reference to Hades, the name of both the Greek Underworld and the god who ruled it. Styx was the river which formed the boundary between Earth and Hades. Orfeo and Erdiss were analogues for Orpheus and Eurydice; in legend, Eurydice dies of a snakebite, and her husband Orpheus travels to Hades to bring her back (albeit unsuccessfully). Herm's name was derived from the god Hermes, one of whose roles was to guide lost souls to Hades. Charon, the ferryman who transports the newly dead across the Styx, became the bargeman Kairon, an accomplice of Herm. A Hadean digging machine was inspired by Cerberus, the three-headed dog who guards the gates to Hades and prevents those who have travelled down the Styx from escaping.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: In Ancient Greece, the Doctor learns that many young women have recently perished from snake bites. Instead of having them buried, however, a medicine man named Herm has encouraged the population to send their bodies by barge down the river Styx. With the help of a musician named Orfeo whose girlfriend, Erdiss, is one of the victims, the Doctor convinces Herm to confess the truth: the girls are not dead but have been drugged, and have been conveyed to a hidden underground city. There, the Doctor confronts aliens called the Hadeans, who have been kidnapping women because their own female population has been made infertile. The Doctor counsels the Hadeans on a genetic solution to their problem.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267, DWM Special Edition #3

Warmongers The Fifth Doctor
Writers: Marc Platt and Jeremy Bentham Notes: Platt and Bentham submitted this unsolicited idea during 1983. Both were longtime Doctor Who fans; Bentham, who used the pseudonym “Charles M Stevens”, was a cofounder of the Doctor Who Appreciation Society. “Warmongers” was rejected, but Platt later wrote Ghost Light for Season Twenty-Six.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Sontarans and the Rutans battle each other in England during the Blitz.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

Way Down Yonder The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Lesley Elizabeth Thomas Notes: Nathan-Turner was inspired to develop a serial which could be partly filmed in the United States after vacationing in New Orleans during February 1981. Thomas, an American writer living in the UK, was commissioned to prepare a storyline on April 23rd, 1981. This would have included filming in the southern US, but Nathan-Turner and script editor Eric Saward felt that Thomas' idea did not work as a Doctor Who concept, and “Way Down Yonder” was abandoned sometime after November 1981.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, presumably with Nyssa and Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #s 1, 3

The Zeldan The Fifth Doctor
Writer: William Emms Notes: This was offered to the production office around 1983.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

Zeta Plus One see Project Zeta-Sigma

(untitled) The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Tanith Lee Notes: Lee was a well-known writer of science-fiction and fantasy, whose novels included The Dragon Hoard and Night's Master; she had also contributed to the science-fiction programme Blake's 7. She was commissioned to script a Doctor Who serial on February 6th, 1981, but this was ultimately abandoned.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, presumably with Adric, Nyssa and Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty
Stage Reached: Partial(?) script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties