Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (I·J·K)
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Iceberg The Sixth Doctor
aka Flipback
Writer: David Banks Notes: Banks, who had played the Cyberleader since 1982's Earthshock, proposed this story idea around the time that he reprised the role for Attack Of The Cybermen. Also known as “Flipback”, it was not taken forward, but Banks later used it as the basis of a 1993 novel in Virgin Publishing's Doctor Who: The New Adventures range, featuring the Seventh Doctor.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In 2006, human scientists in Antarctica race to construct a device which will undo an imminent reversal of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the Cybermen are also present in Antarctica and are plotting to sabotage the device, giving them the opportunity to conquer the planet in the confusion caused by the reversal. The device is activated prematurely, crippling the Cybermen, and giving the Doctor the opportunity to stop the Cyber forces.
References: Doctor Who: The New Adventures: Iceberg, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3, DWM Special Edition #10

Ice Time see Thin Ice

Illegal Alien The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Robert Perry and Mike Tucker Notes: Tucker was a visual effects assistant on Doctor Who. He and Perry had already submitted one script under a pseudonym, and when this was rejected, Tucker admitted to script editor Andrew Cartmel that he was one of the writers responsible. Cartmel encouraged Perry and Tucker to try again, and they developed “Illegal Alien” in 1988. At this point, Ian Briggs was working on The Curse Of Fenric, which had a similar setting; as such, he advised the pair to wait before submitting their work. They finally did so in early 1989, having written two scripts and storylined the closing episode. However, any further development ceased when Doctor Who was cancelled in September of that year. Perry and Tucker later adapted “Illegal Alien” as a novel for BBC Books, published in October 1997.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: 3
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-Six and Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Partial scripts
Synopsis: The Doctor and Ace confront the Cybermen in World War II London.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM Special Edition #10

The Impersonators The Second Doctor
Writers: Malcolm Hulke Notes: Hulke was commissioned to write a storyline for “The Impersonators” on July 5th, 1968. It was planned that this adventure would form Serial ZZ, with a four-part Serial AAA by Derrick Sherwin then serving as the final story for the Second Doctor. However, when problems hit both projects, it was decided to instead conclude Season Six with a ten-part Serial ZZ, which became The War Games, cowritten by Hulke. “The Impersonators” was formally abandoned on December 30th.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Zoe
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Penultimate story of Season Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4

The Imps The Second Doctor
Writer: William Emms Notes: A year after the transmission of his Galaxy 4, Emms was commissioned to write “The Imps” on October 17th, 1966. The story was rushed into production when it was decided that The Underwater Menace could not be suitably realised on Doctor Who's budget. Emms completed draft scripts and some rewrites before falling ill in November. Around this time, producer Innes Lloyd and story editor Gerry Davis decided to add the character of Jamie as a new companion in The Highlanders, the story preceding “The Imps”, meaning that the character would have to be incorporated into Emms' scripts. With the writer too sick to do the necessary work, The Underwater Menace was resurrected in its spot in the schedule. It was intended that “The Imps” would now follow it into production, but by mid-December, the spot had been given to The Moonbase. “The Imps” was formally rejected on January 4th, 1967, possibly because it would have needed substantial reworking to accommodate the planned exit of Ben and Polly, and the introduction of a new female companion. Emms later used elements of the story for his Sixth Doctor choose-your-own-adventure book, Mission To Venus, published in 1986.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Polly, Ben (and later Jamie)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The fifth or sixth serial of Season Four
Stage Reached: Complete scripts
Synopsis: An interplanetary passenger liner lands at a remote spaceport on Earth, bearing with it imp-like creatures who can become intangible, and alien spores. They cause an aggressive form of vegetation to spring up around the spaceport and attack the humans within.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #209, DWM #299, DWM #322, DWM Special Edition #4

In The Hollows Of Time The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Christopher H Bidmead Notes: On June 19th, 1984, Bidmead was commissioned to provide a storyline inspired by the writer's interest in physics and particularly string theory. By the time full scripts were requested on November 21st, the serial had gained the title “In The Hollows Of Time”. It was probably earmarked as the fifth story of Season Twenty-Three, to be directed by Matthew Robinson (who had recently worked on Attack Of The Cybermen and would also be the director of season premiere “The Nightmare Fair”) as Serial 7E. However, on February 27th, 1985, it was announced that production of Doctor Who was being suspended until Spring 1986, with the programme then returning for a season of twenty-five-minute episodes. Bidmead was asked to rework his storyline for this format. But then, at the end of May, it was decided that Season Twenty-Three would be only fourteen episodes long, leading to the development of The Trial Of A Time Lord and the abandonment of all of the original Season Twenty-Three serials. In February 2010, Bidmead's audio adaptation of his storyline was released by Big Finish Productions under the slightly amended title “The Hollows Of Time”.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Probably the fifth story of Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

Incident On Zeta Minor see Project Zeta-Sigma

Into The Comet The Fourth Doctor
Writer: James Follett Notes: Follett was a novelist who pitched this idea circa September 1979, when it was rejected by script editor Douglas Adams. Follett resubmitted “Into The Comet” to new script editor Christopher H Bidmead around May 1980, but once again the storyline was not pursued.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved monsters attacking a race of beings who live inside Halley's Comet, unaware that there is anything beyond it.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Invasion Of The Veridians The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Nabil Shaban Notes: Shaban was a longtime fan of Doctor Who, and had previously suggested himself to replace the late Roger Delgado as the Master. In offering this script to the production office in 1980, Shaban also put himself forward as a potential successor to Tom Baker as the Doctor. Nothing came of “Invasion Of The Veridians”, but Shaban later played Sil in 1985's Vengeance On Varos and 1986's The Trial Of A Time Lord.
Characters: Presumably the Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Full(?) script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #309

The Killer Cats Of Geng Singh see Killers Of The Dark

Killers Of The Dark The Fourth Doctor
aka The Killer Cats Of Geng Singh
Writer: David Weir Notes: Producer Graham Williams was enamoured with the way the Time Lords had been developed in The Deadly Assassin, and wanted a Gallifrey-related story to close Season Fifteen. Script editor Anthony Read approached Weir, with whom he had worked on The Troubleshooters. The result, “Killers Of The Dark”, was commissioned on July 18th, 1977, and was influenced by Weir's interest in Oriental cultures. (The adventure may also have been known as “The Killer Cats Of Geng Singh” or some variation thereof, although this appears to have been a title made up by Williams after the fact.) A month later, however, both Read and director Gerald Blake determined that Weir's scripts were impossible to realise on Doctor Who's limited budget, boasting set pieces such as a stadium full of cat people. Reluctantly, “Killers Of The Dark” was abandoned in mid-August, leaving Williams and Read to hurriedly write The Invasion Of Time in its place.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Leela, K·9
Episodes: 6
Planned For: The sixth serial of Season Fifteen
Stage Reached: Complete(?) script
Synopsis: Concerned a race of cat people native to Gallifrey.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Winter Special 1992, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The King's Bedtime Story The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: This idea was submitted on January 16th, 1967.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor and his companions are forced to perpetually enact the King's favourite story without changing any aspect of it.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Five

Knight Fall The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Ben Aaronovitch Notes: This unsolicited idea was submitted in May 1987. Script editor Andrew Cartmel liked some of the concepts, but felt that there were too many supporting characters and that it was generally inappropriate for Doctor Who. However, he encouraged Aaronovitch to pitch more stories, and this soon led to Remembrance Of The Daleks.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Five
Stage Reached: Unknown
Synopsis: Concerned privatisation.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #10

The Krikkitmen The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Douglas Adams Notes: This was one of several ideas that Adams proposed to the production office around 1976. It was rejected by script editor Robert Holmes, who nonetheless encouraged Adams to continue submitting material; this ultimately led to his commission for The Pirate Planet. Later, in 1980, Adams revised “The Krikkitmen” for use by Paramount Pictures as a potential Doctor Who feature film, although nothing came of this project. Finally, Adams included many of the ideas from “The Krikkitmen” in his novel Life, The Universe And Everything, the second sequel to his fantastically popular The Hitch-Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Fifteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Two million years ago, the inhabitants of the planet Krikkit built a race of androids called the Krikkitmen to wipe out all life in the universe. They were stopped by the Time Lords, who trapped Krikkit within a temporal prison. Now, however, a group of Krikkitmen which escaped the Time Lords' sentence are trying to reassemble the components of a key which can free Krikkit -- components of which happen to resemble elements of the Earth game of cricket, itself actually a reflection of the ancient war. The Doctor and Sarah stumble upon this plot when they see the Krikkitmen steal the Ashes during a test match at Lords. They then travel to the planet Bethselamin to foil the next step in the Krikkitmen's quest.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #253, DWM Special Edition #9, Doctor Who: The Seventies

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