Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (E·F)
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Earth Aid The Seventh Doctor
aka Bad Destination
Writer: Ben Aaronovitch Notes: During the summer of 1988, Aaronovitch and script editor Andrew Cartmel collaborated on War World, an ultimately unused script for the Doctor Who stage play which became The Ultimate Adventure. When considering ideas for Season Twenty-Seven, they decided to revive an alien race created for War World called the Metatraxi. The likely season premiere would have been that year's three-part, studiobound serial. However, Aaronovitch had only roughed out the script for the first scene and developed vague ideas about the rest of the storyline when Doctor Who was cancelled in September 1989. At this point, the adventure was untitled; it was dubbed “Earth Aid” by Doctor Who Magazine in 1997, although “Bad Destination” was also later proposed. “Earth Aid” was eventually adapted by Aaronovitch and Cartmel as an audio play, released by Big Finish Productions in July 2011.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: 3
Planned For: Probably the first story of Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Ace poses as the captain of a spaceship in a conflict against the Metatraxi, alien insectoid creatures with a Samurai-like code of honour.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM #433, DWM Special Edition #10

Earthshock The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Eric Saward's Earthshock.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In modern-day Wyoming, the Doctor investigates the murder of a team of palaeontologists in a cave system. The culprits are the Cybs -- cybernetic pirates -- who have planted a bomb which can destroy the Earth. The Doctor deactivates the bomb and traces its command signal to a space freighter, which the Cybs intend to crash into the Earth.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Elite The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg submitted this idea in late 1982 after completing Enlightenment, but it was not pursued. In October 2011, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation “The Elite” by John Dorney.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands in a city embroiled in a protracted war. Most of the population is very young, and has been bred for intelligence to give them a strategic advantage. Appalled, the Doctor is branded a war criminal but saved by the twelve year-old General Aubron. They join forces with savages on the surface of the planet who turn out to be people banished from the city because they were not sufficiently intelligent. Together, they assault the bunker of the ruling High Priest. The High Priest turns out to be a Dalek who crashlanded on the planet centuries earlier, and who has been manipulating the society to elevate them to the point where they will make it possible for the Dalek to return to Skaro.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267, DWM Special Edition #3

The Endgame The Seventh Doctor
Writer: David Roden Notes: In July 1993, it appeared that Dimensions In Time -- the proposed thirtieth-anniversary Doctor Who sketch designed to air as part of the BBC's Children In Need charity telethon -- would have to be scrapped due to issues with the planned crossover involving characters and locations from the soap opera EastEnders. Roden developed “The Endgame” in its place; he had recently appeared with Michael Gough in the play Wittgenstein and believed that the actor would be willing to reprise his eponymous role from 1966's The Celestial Toymaker. Roden hoped that the special could be filmed at Dreamland in Margate, while production manager Gary Downie thought that permission could be granted to use Chessington World of Adventures for free. However, “The Endgame” was dropped when the EastEnders situation was resolved.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, the Sixth Doctor, the Fifth Doctor, the Fourth Doctor, the Third Doctor, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart
Episodes: 2 (5 minutes)
Planned For: 1993 Special
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: The Celestial Toymaker has captured the Doctor's earlier incarnations, whom he wants to possess and turn into more Toymakers. The Seventh Doctor agrees to compete against the Toymaker in a game, with all of his lives at stake. Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart and UNIT must locate the TARDIS in a funfair guarded by Cybermen. When the Brigadier wins the game, the Doctors join together to attack the Toymaker. The Brigadier takes advantage of the opportunity to shoot the Toymaker, who is sucked into the sphere he had used to hold the Doctors captive. The earlier Doctors are returned to their proper place in the timestream, while the Seventh Doctor and the Brigadier plan to deposit the sphere in a black hole, trapping the Toymaker forever.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #324

End Of Term see Paradise Five

The Enemy Within The Fifth 
Doctor
Writer: Christopher Priest Notes: To make up for the rejection of “Sealed Orders”, which had been abandoned in June 1980, Priest was commissioned to storyline “The Enemy Within” on December 5th of that year. By the time full scripts were requested on February 6th, 1981, it had been decided that Priest's serial would culminate in the death of Adric, whom producer John Nathan-Turner felt was not working out as a companion. Around the middle of June, a disagreement about rewrite fees and a vitriolic exchange with Nathan-Turner led to Priest's refusal to perform requested rewrites on “The Enemy Within”. It was hastily replaced by Earthshock, while Priest's scripts were formally abandoned on July 17th.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The sixth serial of Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a monster at the heart of the TARDIS which embodies the Doctor's deepest fears. The story featured characters called Timewrights, and ended with Adric's demise.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #239, DWM #292, DWM Special Edition #1

Erinella The Fourth Doctor
aka Dragons Of Fear
Writer: Pennant Roberts Notes: Roberts, who had directed several stories (most recently The Pirate Planet), began working on “Dragons Of Fear” in the fall of 1978, drawing on elements of both Celtic folklore and the Welsh language. A script commission followed on January 10th, 1979, with a view to making it the fifth serial of Season Seventeen (the slot eventually occupied by The Horns Of Nimon). However, “Dragons Of Fear” would have to be an expensive production, and it soon became clear that the Doctor Who budget would not stretch to afford both it and City Of Death. The story was dropped around February, by which time it had been retitled “Erinella” (which roughly translates as “Another Ireland” in Gaelic). In January 1980, “Erinella” was recommissioned, with the intention of inserting it into Season Eighteen (possibly as the penultimate serial, since Roberts was told that he would have to replace Romana with new companion Adric). However, incoming script editor Christopher H Bidmead wanted to ground Doctor Who in more realistic science, which was at odds with the premise of “Erinella”. Bidmead suggested several major changes to the storyline, but by now Roberts was fatigued with the process, and disinterested in pursuing the project further. In the mid-Eighties, Roberts resubmitted “Erinella” to script editor Eric Saward, but nothing came of this.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9 (original submission; the resubmission replaced Romana and K·9 with Adric)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The fifth serial of Season Seventeen; Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The Doctor, Romana and K·9 arrive on the planet Erinella. There, the Doctor is immediately arrested and accused of poisoning a local noble. Indeed, everyone seems to recognise him, despite the fact that he's never been to Erinella before. Romana and K·9 retreat to the woods where they meet Og, the keeper of Erinella's dragons. Meanwhile, the Doctor discovers that the true murderer is a Queen who is scheming to control all of Erinella. Moreover, he has accidentally arrived on the planet later than he was meant to. He escapes and travels back in time to set in motion the events that he has already witnessed. Romana convinces Og to send the dragons against the Queen, while the Doctor tricks her into confessing her crimes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #248, DWM Special Edition #9

The Evil Eye The First Doctor
Writer: Geoffrey Orme Notes: “The Evil Eye” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Eye In Space The Second Doctor
Writer: Victor Pemberton Notes: Doctor Who producer Peter Bryant asked Pemberton to develop a new idea shortly after completing Fury From The Deep in late 1967. When Bryant left Doctor Who in early 1969, Pemberton decided not to pursue the story, and it was not formally commissioned.
Characters: The Second Doctor (with Jamie and Zoe?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Concerned an omniscient octopoid eye in space which drew things toward it.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #318, DWM Special Edition #4

The Eyes Of Nemesis The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles submitted this storyline on May 16th, 1975. It was inspired in part by the legend of the Wandering Jew.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: On an alien planet, an old beggar named Lakdem is pursued by Myrron androids, but is immune to their destructive weaponry. The TARDIS materialises, and the Doctor is captured by the Myrron commander, Torr. Sarah takes Lakdem back to the TARDIS, where he sheds his skin to become a younger man. Together, they rescue the Doctor and Lakdem sets the coordinates to take to the TARDIS to his planet of origin, the secret world of Oinos. There, he reveals that he is also an android: one of Thirteen Watchers created by Death and infused with awesome power to wander the universe and observe its progress. However, Torr has tracked the TARDIS to Oinos and reveals that he serves the Celestial Toymaker, who desires Death's power for himself. The Doctor challenges the Toymaker, and the distraction allows Lakdem to accelerate time around the Myrrons, destroying them utterly.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Face Of God The First Doctor
Writer: John Wiles Notes: Wiles appears to have contemplated this idea while he served as producer of Doctor Who in 1965.
Characters: The First Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Season Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In space, a massive countenance materialises in front of the TARDIS; the being claims to be God, but this is eventually revealed to be a hoax.
References: Doctor Who: The Sixties

Farer Nohan The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Stephenson Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 18th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

Farewell Great Macedon The First Doctor
aka Alexander The Great
Writer: Moris Farhi Notes: Although a sample script written by Farhi, “The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance”, was rejected by story editor David Whitaker, he was nonetheless encouraged to continue to develop ideas for Doctor Who. Aware that Farhi was interested in Greco-Roman mythology, on January 24th, 1964 Whitaker suggested an adventure about the Greek pirate Barbarossa, in which the Doctor would be forced to invite somebody into the TARDIS. Farhi instead began work on “Farewell Great Macedon” (also called “Alexander The Great ”); such was his enthusiasm for the project that he ignored Whitaker's advice to write only one script and instead produced a full six-part serial. His episodes bore the titles 1. The Hanging Gardens Of Babylon, 2. The Wrath Of The Greatest Grecian Of Them All! or O, Son! My Son!, 3. A Man Must Die, 4. The World Lies Dead At Your Feet, 5. In The Arena, 6. Farewell, Great Macedon!. The first episode, notably, would have explained the time travellers' ability to understand other languages by showing them hooked up to a computer which teaches them Ancient Greek. Initially, Whitaker felt that Farhi's scripts simply needed tightening up, but after the transmission of Marco Polo, the production office apparently elected to gear the historical adventures such that they were set on the periphery, rather than in the midst, of famous historical events, in response to criticism from schools (although this must have been abandoned by the time The Romans was made less than a year later). Farhi was unwilling to rewrite his storyline to reflect this edict, and so “Farewell Great Macedon” was abandoned on July 31st. In November 2010, Big Finish Production released an audio adaptation of “Farewell Great Macedon” by John Dorney.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS materialises amidst the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, where the Doctor and his companions meet Alexander the Great. Four members of Alexander's retinue, however, are plotting to murder the king and his successors so that one of their number, Seleucus, can ascend to the throne and allow them to return to their homeland. The conspirators try to frame the time travellers, but the Doctor and Ian succeed in a series of trials and Alexander's bodyguard, Ptolemy, proves their innocence. However, history cannot be changed, and despite the Doctor's efforts to save the king's life by having Ian build an iron lung, Alexander dies while Ptolemy helps the companions escape to the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #294

The Female Of The Species see The Prison In Space

The Final Game The Third Doctor
Writer: Robert Sloman Notes: Created in response to Roger Delgado's desire for the Master to be written out of Doctor Who -- because his attachment to the programme was making it difficult for him to find other work -- a storyline for “The Final Game” was commissioned on February 15th, 1973, and was inspired in part by producer Barry Letts' interest in Eastern philosophy. “The Final Game” had to be abandoned when Delgado died in a car accident while filming in Turkey on June 18th. In its place, Sloman developed Planet Of The Spiders instead.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: The final serial of Season Eleven
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and the Master are revealed to be two aspects of the same person -- the Master representing the “id” (instinctual needs and desires) and the Doctor the “ego” (conscious perception of and adaptation to reality). The Master ultimately perishes in an explosion which saves the lives of the Doctor and others; it remains unclear if this was a final act of redemption on the villain's part.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #314

Fires Of The Starmind The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: This was an unsolicited submission made to script editor Robert Holmes in late 1975. Holmes felt that it lacked action and drama, and was in need of a proper antagonist. Nonetheless, he thought that “Fires Of The Starmind” had more potential than most amateur submissions and encouraged Platt to continue writing. “Fires Of The Starmind” was rejected on December 15th, but after numerous attempts, Platt would finally earn a Doctor Who credit on Ghost Light in 1989.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane, Harry
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Complete(?) script
Synopsis: Information in the Time Lord libraries is stored on photons. A sentient star uses this as a means of invading Gallifrey.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #305

The First Sontarans The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: Smith, who had written Full Circle for Season Eighteen, was commissioned to provide a storyline for “The First Sontarans” on January 10th, 1984 after impressing script editor Eric Saward with two unsolicted ideas entitled “The Dark Samurai” and “The Metraki”. However, Smith's concept was abandoned in mid-February when it was decided that Robert Holmes, the creator of the Sontarans, would revisit them in The Two Doctors. Smith later adapted “The First Sontarans” as an audio script for Big Finish Productions, released in July 2012.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432, DWM Special Edition #3

Flipback see Iceberg

The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance The First Doctor
Writer: Moris Farhi Notes: On January 6th, 1964, Farhi contacted story editor David Whitaker about writing for Doctor Who. Whitaker commissioned a script for one episode, which became “The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance”. Whitaker rejected this on the 24th, feeling its subject matter was unsuitable for Doctor Who, but encouraged Farhi to continue to develop ideas for the programme. In November 2010, Big Finish Production released an audio adaptation of “The Fragrant Yellow Arc Of Fragrance” by John Dorney.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 1
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: On an alien planet, a man named Rhythm woos Barbara. She is unaware, however, that her rejection of his advances mean that Rhythm is now sentenced to die.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Furies see The Space War

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