Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (L·M)
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
?

The Labyrinth see The Space-Part People

The Lady Killers see The Prison In Space

The Laird Of McCrimmon The Second Doctor
Writers: Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln Notes: By late April 1968, it was clear that Frazer Hines would be leaving Doctor Who sometime during Season Six. One candidate for his departure story was Haisman and Lincoln's third Yeti serial, which they were working on around the start of June. Over the summer, however, the writers became embroiled in a dispute over copyright with the BBC regarding the Quarks, robot monsters which had appeared in their previous Doctor Who commission, The Dominators. The ensuing acrimony resulted in the abandonment of “The Laird Of McCrimmon” during August.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A possessed Jamie pilots the TARDIS to 1746 Scotland and his ancestral home, Castle McCrimmon. There, he finds the current Laird, Sir James, is on his deathbed. Yeti appear and surround the castle while the local villagers fall under the influence of the Great Intelligence; the only person who seems to be immune is a girl named Fiona, with whom Jamie falls in love. The Great Intelligence wants to inhabit Jamie's body and become the Laird once Sir James dies. However, the Intelligence is defeated by the Doctor, and Jamie decides to stay behind and become Laird himself.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #262, DWM Special Edition #4

The Land Of Fear The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Dennis Spooner's The Reign Of Terror.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor knows that his lost father, Ulysses, was acquainted with Robespierre, and so he travels to 1790 Paris. There he meets an English spy named James Stirling, who is plotting Robespierre's assassination.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Last Adventure see Pinacotheca

League Of The Tandreds The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Peter Grimwade Notes: Grimwade submitted this idea after completing Planet Of Fire in 1983, at a time when his relationship with both producer John Nathan-Turner and script editor Eric Saward was in decline. A storyline was commissioned on August 13th, 1984. On November 8th, however, Nathan-Turner decided to drop “League Of The Tandreds”, apparently for budgetary reasons.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two or Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Leviathan The Sixth Doctor
aka Livanthian
Writer: Brian Finch Notes: Finch was a veteran writer who was known to producer John Nathan-Turner from his scripts for All Creatures Great & Small, on which Nathan-Turner had served as production unit manager; Finch's other credits included episodes of the science-fiction classic The Tomorrow People. Finch was commissioned to write “Livanthian” (a misspelling of “Leviathan”) on August 14th, 1983. His scripts were submitted in November -- with the title appropriately amended -- but they were apparently deemed too costly to make. After Finch's death in 2007, his son, Paul, offered these scripts to Big Finish Productions for their forthcoming range of Doctor Who audio plays based upon unmade serials. Paul himself performed the necessary rewrites on “Leviathan”, which was released in January 2010.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

Livanthian see Leviathan

The Living Planet The First Doctor
Writer: Alan Wakeman Notes: Wakeman was part of an early set of writers approached in summer 1963 to contribute to Doctor Who, which was still in development. Wakeman's storyline, “The Living Planet”, was deemed to have sufficient potential that the script for the first episode was commissioned on July 31st. (References on some production documents which described this script as a “pilot” would later provoke erroneous speculation that Wakeman's episode may have been considered as an alternative to launch Doctor Who in lieu of 100,000 BC.) At this point, the Doctor's granddaughter was still known as Suzanne (rather than Susan) and her female teacher was Barbara Canning (instead of Barbara Wright). Wakeman also used ideas for the programme's backstory developed by 100,000 BC writer Anthony Coburn but ultimately discarded, in which Suzanne is really an alien princess named Findooclare and she and the Doctor are being pursued by the mysterious Palladins. Wakeman's planned episode titles were Airfish, What Eats What?, The Living Planet, and Just In Time. “The Living Planet” was deemed to be too sophisticated for the intended child audience and abandoned. In 2005, following Doctor Who's successful return to television, Wakeman unsuccessfully offered “The Living Planet” to executive producer Russell T Davies.
Characters: The First Doctor, Suzanne, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on a planet whose surface is largely covered with a pattern of small, edible hexagonal structures. The travellers are attacked by flying metallic fish which also surround the TARDIS. The Doctor fears that the mysterious Palladins have finally caught up to himself and Suzanne, but they are saved when long stems extend out from the hexagons, spearing the animals. They realise that the fish are part of the planet's bizarre ecosystem. Drawn by a strange, maddening sound, they discover a series of holes, down which Suzanne becomes trapped. Ian ventures into a hole to rescue her, and they deduce that the entire planet is a gigantic living organism -- the hexagons are like skin cells and the holes permit respiration. The planet tries to absorb the TARDIS, but its alien construction is incompatible and the planet is forced to release it, allowing the travellers to escape.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Summer Special 1994, DWM Special Edition #4, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Lords Of Misrule The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Ted Willis Notes: One of the founding fathers of British television drama, Dixon Of Dock Green creator Willis had worked with Doctor Who script editor Anthony Read during the Sixties. Read commissioned Willis to write “The Lords Of Misrule” in late 1977 or early 1978, but it does not appear that it proceeded past the storyline stage. Its spot was eventually taken by The Power Of Kroll.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fifth story of Season Sixteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The people of the planet Tetran are enslaved by the cruel Shadowlords, who rule from an orbiting castle. The Shadowlords hunt their subjects using wolf-life Prowlers, and force them to duel one another. The Doctor discovers that the Tetrans are actually descended from the survivors of a crashed mining ship, while the Shadowlords are security robots, disguised and maddened due to their connection with the pilot, who is held on the brink of death by the vessel's computer. K·9 severs the pilot's link with the ship, deactivating the Shadowlords. The Doctor and Romana recover the fifth segment of the Key To Time, concealed as a massive crystal powering the Shadowlords' castle.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Summer Special 1995

The Lords Of The Red Planet The Second Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Producer Peter Bryant requested a second Ice Warrior adventure from their creator, Brian Hayles, both to capitalise on the popularity of the monsters following their debut in The Ice Warriors, and to get additional use out of the expensive costumes. “The Lords Of The Red Planet” was commissioned on February 2nd, 1968. However, no further development seems to have taken place, and on July 15th, a new Ice Warrior storyline -- The Seeds Of Death -- was commissioned from Hayles. In November 2013, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “Lords Of The Red Planet” by John Dorney.
Characters: The Second Doctor (with Jamie and Zoe?)
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine #274

Lost In The Dark Dimension see The Dark Dimension

The Lost Legion The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Douglas Camfield Notes: After directing The Seeds Of Doom for Season Thirteen, Camfield approached producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes about the possibility of writing a serial for the next block of episodes, as Camfield also had some scripting credits to his name. Holmes harboured doubts about the idea, but Hinchcliffe was enthusiastic and so “The Lost Legion” was commissioned on January 22nd, 1976. The story idea stemmed from Camfield's fascination with military history, and his admiration of the 1924 novel Beau Geste by PC Wren. By this point, Elisabeth Sladen had already indicated that she would be leaving Doctor Who after the second story of Season Fourteen, and so “The Lost Legion” was developed with the intention of dramatically writing Sarah Jane Smith out of the programme by killing her off. It was anticipated that Camfield would also direct his own serial. When he submitted his first script on February 9th, however, it did not meet Holmes' approval, and he began to groom The Hand Of Fear as a possible replacement. Camfield thereafter became increasingly late with his submissions, and “The Lost Legion” was taken off the schedule by the end of March. Camfield continued working on the story -- finally submitting the script for part four on September 24th -- but by this time the production team had no interest in developing it further.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Second serial of Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: An isolated North African outpost of the French Foreign Legion becomes the focal point of a confrontation between the Skarkel and the Khoorians, two factions of an alien race. At the story's conclusion, the last of the aliens shoots Sarah Jane as it dies, and she expires in the Doctor's arms. The Legionnaires build a funeral pyre for Sarah, which burns as the TARDIS dematerialises.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

Lungbarrow The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: Platt was working on “Lungbarrow” by the autumn of 1988, drawing elements from Mervyn Peake's 1950 fantasy novel Gormenghast and its sequels. “Lungbarrow” was meant to be a milestone in script editor Andrew Cartmel's redevelopment of the Doctor Who mythos, introducing the notion that Time Lords are sterile and maintain their population through the use of genetic Looms. The Doctor begins to realise that he is related, through the Loom at Lungbarrow, to the Other -- a mysterious figure in Gallifreyan prehistory who was part of a triumvirate of Time Lord pioneers with Rassilon and Omega. However, producer John Nathan-Turner was wary of rushing into such a major revelation, and so “Lungbarrow” was reworked as Ghost Light. Platt later used his original storyline as the basis for the final Seventh Doctor release in Virgin Publishing's Doctor Who: The New Adventures range; this Lungbarrow was published in March 1997.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor confronts his bizarre family of cousins at Lungbarrow, his sentient ancestral home in South Gallifrey.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #10

The Macro Men >The Fifth 
Doctor The Sixth Doctor
aka The Macros
Writers: Ingrid Pitt and Tony Rudlin Notes: Pitt had just appeared in Season Twenty-One's Warriors Of The Deep when she and her husband, Rudlin, submitted several story ideas to the Doctor Who production office. Of those, only “The Macro Men” -- inspired by the 1979 conspiracy theory text The Philadelphia Experiment: Project Invisibility by William L Moore and Charles Berlitz -- seems to have been pursued. This was conceived as a Fifth Doctor story, but was refashioned for the Sixth Doctor by the time the script for the first episode was commissioned on January 19th, 1984. During the drafting stage, the adventure's title was amended to “The Macros”, but although Pitt and Rudlin worked closely with script editor Eric Saward, the project did not proceed further. Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Macros” in June 2010.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor (original version), the Sixth Doctor (later version), Peri
Episodes: 4 (original version), 2 (45-minute; revised version)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Macros see The Macro Men

The Man From The Met The First Doctor
Writer: George Kerr Notes: This idea was submitted around the start of April 1966 and rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Four, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

Manpower The Fifth Doctor The Sixth Doctor
aka May Time, Children's Seth, The Children Of Seth
Writer: Christopher Bailey Notes: After Bailey completed work on Snakedance, he was commissioned to write a storyline called “May Time” on August 24th, 1982. Full scripts were then requested on September 16th, by which time the adventure had become known as “Manpower”. This was apparently dropped, but on August 15th, 1983, Bailey was commissioned to write a set of scripts for the Sixth Doctor entitled “The Children Of Seth” (originally given the apparently erroneous title “Children's Seth”), which he recalls as being a revised version of “Manpower”. By this time, Doctor Who was in the process of shifting from 25-minute to 45-minute episodes. Bailey had trouble devising a structure for his story, and found himself unable to come up with an appropriate nemesis for the Doctor. Disillusioned by the lack of collaboration he was receiving from the Doctor Who production office, Bailey decided to withdraw from the television industry. In December 2011, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Children Of Seth” by Marc Platt.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, presumably with Tegan and Turlough (original submission); the Sixth Doctor and Peri (resubmission)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-One and Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 227, 327, DWM Special Edition #s 1, 3, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Mark Of Lumos The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Keith Miles Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 14th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Masters Of Luxor The First Doctor
aka The Robots
Writer: Anthony Coburn Notes: When Coburn's 100,000 BC, Doctor Who's original second serial, was pushed ahead to replace “The Giants” in June 1963, Coburn was commissioned on June 18th to supply a replacement second story as well, to be directed by Rex Tucker. When Coburn left the BBC to become a freelance writer, the serial had to be recommissioned; this happened on July 3rd, by which time it had gained the title “The Robots” and had been expanded from four to six episodes. “The Robots” was originally set on thirtieth-century Earth, but by the end of the month its location had been shifted to an alien planet. The production team grew increasingly unhappy with “The Robots”, however, and on September 23rd decided to switch it in the running order with the intended fifth story, The Daleks. The following month, the scripts gained a new title, “The Masters Of Luxor”. Around the start of 1964, “Luxor” was postponed until Season Two, at one point being considered for the sixth slot of Doctor Who's second production block. By the end of the year, however, the decision had been made to drop “The Masters Of Luxor” from the schedule altogether. The episode titles for the serial were: 1. The Cannibal Flower, 2. The Mockery Of A Man, 3. A Light On The Dead Planet, 4. Tabon Of Luxor, 5. An Infinity Of Surprises, 6. The Flower Blooms (originally The Flower In Bloom). In August 1992, Titans Books published “The Masters Of Luxor” as a script book, edited by John McElroy. Then, in August 2012, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation by Nigel Robinson.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 4 (original submission); 6 (resubmission)
Planned For: Seasons One and Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS is drawn by a signal to one of the moons of Luxor. There they discover the world dominated by robots led by the Perfect One. The Perfect One has been experimenting on people to discover the secret of life, and kidnaps Barbara and Susan; he plans to use them as test subjects before draining their life force. The Doctor and Ian escape to the wilderness, where they find and reawaken Tabon, the scientist who invented the Perfect One. Tabon confronts the Perfect One, sending the robots out of control. The robots kill Tabon and destroy the Perfect One while the time travellers escape in the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who: The Scripts: The Masters Of Luxor, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine #331, DWM Special Edition #7

The Masters Of Zenos see The Prison In Space

May Time see Manpower

The Mega The Third Doctor
Writer: Bill Strutton Notes: In 1970, more than five years after completing The Web Planet, Strutton approached the Doctor Who office about writing for the series again. On September 25th, he submitted the storyline for “The Mega”, which was retroactively commissioned on October 19th. Although Strutton worked on the project for a number of weeks, the idea was eventually discarded. In December 2013, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Mega” by Simon Guerrier.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eight
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine #286, DWM Special Edition #2

The Menday Fault The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Wiltshire Notes: In late 1975 or early 1976, Wiltshire, a dentist and magazine editor, submitted a detailed but unsolicited storyline for “The Menday Fault” to the Doctor Who production office. The idea was not pursued.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Thirteen or Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and Sarah Jane join the crew of the Thor, an experimental nuclear submarine attempting to set a new depth record by entering the Fault of Menday in the Bermuda Triangle. The Fault turns out to be a passageway to a subterranean world, and the Thor is captured by a race called the Suranians, led by Zorr. The Suranians' world is lit by a glowing cloud of gas that is beginning to fade, and so Zorr wants to use the Polaris missiles aboard the Thor to invade the surface world. He threatens Sarah's life to force the Doctor's cooperation, but she is saved by Nephus, a merman-like Trelw. Nephus' people are being mind-controlled by the Suranians, but the Doctor manages to destroy the transmitter, inciting a rebellion. Nephus kills Zorr, and the Thor is able to the return to the surface world.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM Special Edition #8

The Mentor Conspiracy The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: After “The Silent Scream” was rejected in early 1975, this was one of the storylines Boucher worked on with producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes. It included the characters of Leela and Andor, who would eventually appear in The Face Of Evil. “The Mentor Conspiracy” underwent some development, but was ultimately turned down on October 30th, 1975.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Leela
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on a colony ship which has been home to a civilisation spanning many generations.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #229, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Metraki The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: This was an unsolicited submission to the Doctor Who production office circa 1983 from the writer of Full Circle. Script editor Eric Saward was impressed enough to commission “The First Sontarans”.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432

A Midwinter's Tale The Tenth Doctor
Writers: Russell T Davies, Phil Ford Notes: The basic idea of a person (originally, the father of the family) suddenly finding himself alone in a deserted hotel at Christmas was a potential storyline Davies conceived for the 2008 Christmas special, a spot eventually taken by The Next Doctor. Some months later, he decided to revisit it for what was intended to be the 2009 Christmas special, which he would be cowriting with Ford. Davies also drew upon elements of a second Christmas 2008 idea, in which the Earth is transformed into a fantasy landscape generated by the dormant mind of Harry Potter author JK Rowling. The character of the grandmother grew out of Davies' desire to include a strong, older female as one of the temporary companions featured in the 2009 specials. Ford took these ideas and developed a storyline called “A Midwinter's Tale”. However, Davies was already beginning to have misgivings about the adventure, as he feared that it would be impractical to stage a deserted London and was unsure that the notion could generate enough incident for a one-hour special. After reading Ford's treatment, he decided that the fantasy element was too strong, and concluded that “A Midwinter's Tale” represented a “dead end” for the special. He had already devised a replacement idea, and this evolved into The Waters Of Mars. The essential idea for “A Midwinter's Tale” was ultimately used as the basis for The Empty Planet, part of the fourth season of The Sarah Jane Adventures.
Characters: The Eleventh Doctor, “Gran”
Episodes: 1 (60-minute)
Planned For: Second 2009 special
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A grandmother is trapped in a posh hotel with her unruly family. Wishing that they'd all just disappear, she storms out of their suite to fetch some ice, only to find the corridors deserted. Returning to her rooms, she discovers that her family has indeed disappeared -- but so has all of humanity. Finally, she comes upon the TARDIS and the Doctor. Investigating, they discover eight-legged centaur-like creatures abroad in London. It transpires that aliens from another dimension, the Shi'ar, have frozen time on Earth in order to hold a festival celebrating the marriage of their queen. The life of the grandmother's family becomes endangered, culminating in a race through secret tunnels beneath Buckingham Palace.
References: Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale -- The Final Chapter

Mission To Magnus The Sixth Doctor
aka Planet Of Storms
Writer: Philip Martin Notes: Producer John Nathan-Turner was happy with the villain Sil whom Philip Martin had created for Vengeance On Varos. He quickly asked Martin for a sequel, and “Mission To Magnus” was commissioned on August 29th, 1984. (The title “Planet Of Storms” may also have been considered.) It was decided that this story would feature the return of the Ice Warriors, last seen in 1974's Vengeance On Varos. “Mission To Magnus” was probably intended to be the fourth story of Season Twenty-Three, directed by Ron Jones (who had helmed Vengeance On Varos) as Serial 7D. On February 27th, however, it was announced that production of Doctor Who was being suspended until Spring 1986; ultimately all of the stories originally planned for Season Twenty-Three were abandoned in favour of The Trial Of A Time Lord. Martin was instead commissioned to write The Trial Of A Time Lord (Segment Two). Target Books published Martin's novelisation of “Mission To Magnus” in July 1990, while December 2009 saw the release of Martin's audio adaptation from Big Finish Productions.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Probably the fourth story of Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Partial scripts
Synopsis: The Doctor is lured to the planet Magnus Epsilon by Anzor, a Time Lord who used to bully him at the Academy. The planet has been ravaged by a virus which is fatal to any male exposed to sunlight. However, Zandusia, ruler of Magnus Epsilon, believes that the neighboring planet Salvak has found a cure and plans an invasion. She petitions the Time Lords to travel back in time and prevent the virus from ever being released. When Anzor refuses, Zandusia tries to steal the secrets of time travel. Meanwhile, the Doctor's old enemy Sil is on Magnus Epsilon, apparently in Zandusia's employ. The Doctor lays a trap for Zandusia in Anzor's TARDIS, but the other Time Lord is caught in it, and is locked into a slow course back to the origin of the universe. Peri join forces with a runaway boy named Vion to rescue the Doctor. Together, they investigate ice tunnels and discover that Sil is really working with the Ice Warriors, led by Ice Lord Vedikael, who set off a series of explosions to change the tilt of the planet's axis. This will make Magnus Epsilon an arctic world suitable for the Ice Warriors, and Sil will profit by selling cold weather gear to the natives. However, when the Ice Warriors decide to eliminate Sil now that his usefulness is at an end, he reveals the existence of back-up explosives. The Doctor sets these off, restoring Magnus Epsilon's orientation. The Ice Warriors are killed by the return of the heat, and the Salvakans arrive to offer to help rebuild the planet.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Mists Of Madness The Third Doctor
Writer: Brian Wright Notes: Script editor Terrance Dicks commissioned the storyline from Wright on February 17th, 1969, and it was submitted on May 9th. Subsequently, however, Wright took up an academic writing post in Bristol, leaving him with no time to complete work on “The Mists Of Madness”, which was then dropped from the schedule.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Liz
Episodes: 7
Planned For: Final story of Season Seven
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor discovers an artificially-created human community.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2

More Deadly Than The Male see The Prison In Space

Mouth Of Grath The Fourth Doctor
Writers: Malcolm Edwards and Leroy Kettle Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 18th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Mutant The Second Doctor
Writer: Barry Letts Notes: Letts submitted this idea around November 1966, when it was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis. Later, when Letts was the producer of Doctor Who, he suggested that writers Bob Baker and Dave Martin incorporate elements of this concept into a story of their own, which became The Mutants.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Seasons Four or Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Concerned a race of creatures which underwent dramatic mutations, like a caterpillar evolving into a butterfly, over the span of their lifetimes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #230, DWM Special Edition #4

Multiface The Third Doctor
Writer: Godfrey Harrison Notes: This was an experimental storyline commissioned by producer Barry Letts on July 19th, 1971 while script editor Terrance Dicks was on holiday. Although considerable development was undertaken, Letts eventually decided that “Multiface” was turning out to be more fantastical than he felt appropriate for Doctor Who, and it was abandoned on February 25th, 1972.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Nine or Ten
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2, Doctor Who: The Seventies

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
?