Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (P·Q·R)
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Paradise Five The Sixth Doctor
aka End Of Term
Writer: PJ Hammond Notes: When script editor Eric Saward rejected “Pinacotheca”, the planned “future” segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord, fan adviser Ian Levine suggested he contact Hammond, who had created the cult classic Sapphire & Steel. On February 10th, 1986, Hammond was commissioned to write “End Of Term”, which soon became known as “Paradise Five”. Although Hammond worked quickly, producer John Nathan-Turner was unhappy with his work, and the scripts were abandoned towards the end of the month. The “future” segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord was then taken over by Pip and Jane Baker. Had Hammond's script been retained, it would have been revealed in the season's final episodes that Gabriel's business partner was in fact the Valeyard, and Lorelei was the Valeyard's companion cum mistress. In March 2010, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of Hammond's scripts under the slightly amended title “Paradise 5”. Written by Andy Lane, this saw Peri replace Mel as the Doctor's companion.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Mel
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The third segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord for Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Full scripts
Synopsis: The nine moons of the planet Paradise form a vast holiday complex. The Doctor's evidence at his trial depicts his adventure on Paradise Five, where he suspects something is very wrong. Mel poses as a hostess and befriends Lorelei, an assistant to the sinister Gabriel who runs Paradise Five. With the help of holidaymakers Tapp and Aht, they realise that people are disappearing, and nobody has booked their time on the pleasure world themselves; rather, the trips are always last-minute surprises. Investigating one of the collection ships which ferries people away from Paradise Five, the Doctor discovers that it is a slave vessel, with angelic aliens kidnapping the holidaymakers. Gabriel uncovers Mel's ruse and Lorelei reveals herself as one of the alien slavers in disguise. The Doctor, Mel, Tapp and Aht are trapped on the ship. But Aht, a scientist, deduces that the aliens are vulnerable to elevated temperatures, and Mel organises everyone into an aerobics routine to generate body heat. The aliens are unable to hold their form, allowing the prisoners to escape to the shuttle port, where they are able to alert the authorities. The Valeyard accuses the Doctor of failure, because he was unable to uncover the identity of Gabriel's mysterious business partner.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #203, DWM Special Edition #3

Parasites The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Bill Lyons Notes: Lyons, who had written for Blake's 7, was commissioned to provide a storyline for “Parasites” (also referred to as “The Parasites”) on September 22nd, 1981. Scripts were commissioned on February 16th and April 23rd, 1982, but the story ultimately went unmade.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan (presumably with Nyssa and/or Turlough)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty or Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

The People Who Couldn't Remember The First Doctor
Writers: David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke Notes: After being submitted in April 1966, the satirical “The People Who Couldn't Remember” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th. Davis wanted to avoid outright comedies in the wake of the poor reception of The Gunfighters.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Polly and Ben?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #212, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

Pinacotheca The Sixth Doctor
aka The Last Adventure
Writer: Christopher H Bidmead Notes: When “Attack From The Mind” and “The Second Coming”, the two-part stories originally intended to form the “future” segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord, were abandoned, Bidmead was approached to fill the gap with a four-episode serial. On October 29th, 1985 he was commissioned to write “The Last Adventure”, which soon became known as “Pinacotheca” after the Greek word for a picture gallery. Bidmead worked closely with script editor Eric Saward, submitting each script and soliciting feedback before proceeding to the next installment. After submitting his second draft on January 9th, 1986 Bidmead heard nothing for a month, at which point he was shocked to learn that Saward had advised producer John Nathan-Turner on February 2nd to reject “Pinacotheca” on the grounds of being boring and unusable. The “future” segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord was ultimately written by Pip and Jane Baker.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Mel
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The third segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord for Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Full scripts
Synopsis: The latest evidence in the Doctor's trial by the Time Lords is his investigation of Pinacotheca, a planet which serves as a museum of key times and places in the history of the universe.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Pirates The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Brian Hayles' The Smugglers.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor's search for his father Ulysses takes him to 18th-century Spain, where he believes that his father may be posing as Blackbeard. The Doctor acquires a treasure map which is supposed to lead to Blackbeard's treasure, and winds up being pursued by pirates who are also searching for the booty.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Place Of Serenity see The Guardians Of Prophecy

The Place Where All Times Meet The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Colin Davis Notes: A storyline was commissioned from Davis -- who had written for Blake's 7 -- on June 10th, 1982. Davis' idea was apparently not pursued beyond this point.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Planet Of Storms see Mission To Magnus

Point Of Entry The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg, who had written Enlightenment, submitted this idea circa early 1985, but it was not taken up by the production team. In April 2010, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “Point Of Entry” by Marc Platt.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: In England around 1590, the Doctor and Peri meet Christopher Marlowe, who is writing The Tragical History Of Doctor Faustus. Marlowe has been assisted by a Spaniard named Velez, who claims to be an immortal alchemist. Investigating, the Doctor learns that Velez has been possessed by an Omn -- a member of the Omnim, a race whose conscience was preserved in an asteroid when their planet was destroyed. Part of this asteroid became a meteorite which fell to Earth in South America, where the Omn inspired the legend of the Aztec god Quetzacoatl. Velez acquires a knife made from the meteorite which can inspire rage in anyone nearby, and which will allow him to bring the remaining Omnim to Earth. The Doctor discovers that the Omnim are suspectible to sound at a certain frequency, and with Marlowe's help succeeds in destroying the Omn and the knife, averting the invasion.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #276, DWM Special Edition #3

Poison The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Rod Beacham Notes: Beacham was commissioned to write a storyline for “Poison” on April 27th, 1982, with full scripts contracted exactly a month later, on May 27th.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Pompeii The Ninth Doctor
Writer: Russell T Davies Notes: In casting about for a budget-saving storyline for the penultimate adventure of Doctor Who's first season back on the air, executive producer Davies briefly considered “Pompeii” after watching the BBC broadcast of the docudrama Pompeii: The Last Day in October 2003. It was eventually replaced by Boom Town, while the notion of setting a story in Pompeii was ultimately given to James Moran to develop for The Fires Of Pompeii three years later.
Characters: The Ninth Doctor, Rose, Jack
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Eleventh episode of Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Involved the destruction of the Roman city of Pompeii following the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #11

Power Play The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Gary Hopkins Notes: Hopkins was working on his scripts, which would have seen the return of former companion Victoria Waterfield, when it was announced on February 27th, 1985 that production of Doctor Who was being suspended until Spring 1986. Together with the subsequent reduction of Season Twenty-Three to fourteen episodes, this resulted in the abandonment of all projects considered up to that point. In June 2012, Hopkins' audio adaptation of “Power Play” was released by Big Finish Productions.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Partial scripts
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Prisoner Of Time The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Barry Letts Notes: Letts was commissioned to write this storyline on January 21st, 1975, exactly one day before he was contracted to direct The Android Invasion. Letts based “The Prisoner Of Time” on the audition piece he had written for the purpose of casting the role of Sarah Jane Smith in 1973. Although scripts were subsequently requested, producer Philip Hinchcliffe was unhappy with Letts' initial draft of episode one, demanding numerous alterations. Letts was unable to come up with a revised version which was acceptable to the production team, and “The Prisoner Of Time” was abandoned.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Prison In Space The Second Doctor
aka The Amazons, The Female Of The Species, The Lady Killers, The Masters Of Zenos, More Deadly Than The Male, The Revolutionaries, The Strange Suffragettes (whew!)
Writer: Dick Sharples Notes: Concerned that Doctor Who was becoming too serious, producer Peter Bryant asked humour writer Dick Sharples to contribute to the series. A story breakdown for “The Amazons” -- intended to be the first outright Doctor Who comedy since 1965's The Romans -- was commissioned on April 24th, 1968. It was intended to be made as Serial WW, replacing an unknown story which had, in turn, replaced “The Dreamspinner”. After suggesting a host of alternative titles, Sharples' adventure became “The Prison In Space” in May; the scripts were commissioned on June 4th. Sharples was told that Frazer Hines intended to leave Doctor Who with Serial WW and so “The Prison In Space” should now write out Jamie and introduce a new companion, Nik, who had been created by producer Peter Bryant and story editor Derrick Sherwin. In September, Hines changed his mind about how early he would be leaving Doctor Who, and Sharples agreed to rewrite the scripts appropriately. Both the production team and the assigned director, David Maloney, were now becoming unhappy with “The Prison In Space”, however, particularly scenes such as one where Jamie dresses up in drag to masquerade as a Dolly Guard. In late September, Sharples informed Bryant that he would not perform any further rewrites on the serial, as he felt he had already done the work requested of him and the production office was now changing their expectations. On October 7th, The Krotons was chosen to replace “The Prison In Space” as Serial WW, despite the fact that Barrie Gosney had already been cast in the latter (possibly as Albert). Despite a series of discussions with Sharples, Bryant finally elected to abandon “The Prison In Space” on October 15th. In December 2010, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Prison In Space” by Simon Guerrier.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Zoe
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fourth story of Season Six
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS materialises on a planet where women have ruled for the past five centuries; they have disenfranchised men, banned war, and developed a way to extend their lifespans so that procreation is no longer imperative. The Doctor and Jamie are arrested and sentenced by President Babs to a prison satellite controlled by the Dolly Guards. They quickly recruit their cellmates -- Albert, Garth and Mervyn -- into helping them foment a resistance movement. Meanwhile, Babs brainwashes Zoe and sends her to the satellite as an ostensible ambassador. Once there, though, Zoe betrays the Doctor and Jamie, and they and their collaborators are put on a rocket destined for a remote planet. However, prior to her conditioning, Zoe told other women about the way males and females coexist on Earth, and this incites a revolution against Babs. The newly enlightened women rescue the Doctor; Jamie frees Zoe from her brainwashing by smacking her behind.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #198, DWM #199, DWM Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Six

Project “4G” see Project Zeta-Sigma

Project Zeta Plus see Project Zeta-Sigma

Project Zeta-Sigma The Fifth Doctor
aka Project “4G”, Project Zeta Plus, Zeta Plus One, Incident On Zeta Minor
Writers: John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch Notes: After completing Meglos, Flanagan and McCulloch began developing “Project ‘4G’”, which was commissioned as a storyline on August 15th, 1980. The writers envisioned the new adventure as a parable on nuclear disarmament, with the detente between the Hawks and the Doves serving as a parallel for the Cold War. Around this time, it was decided that “Project ‘4G’” would be the first story for the Fifth Doctor, and hence the concluding part of a trilogy of adventures featuring the Master. Flanagan and McCulloch were asked to incorporate the Master into their plot, and it was decided that he would replace Sergo, and orchestrate the situation between the Hawks and the Doves in order to take over the solar system. The scripts were commissioned on October 7th; shortly thereafter, the title was changed to “Project Zeta Plus”. By early 1981, the story had become “Project Zeta-Sigma”, but concerns were mounting over scenes such as one involving a room full of invisible people. On February 19th, the decision was made to drop “Project Zeta-Sigma” from the production schedule. Consideration may have been given to deferring it to be made second (after Four To Doomsday), but ultimately Castrovalva was developed as the new season premiere. It was thought that “Project Zeta-Sigma” might be reworked to serve as the Season Nineteen finale, but this slot was taken by Time-Flight.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: First (later seventh) story of Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Two hostile planets are verging on war after one planet -- that of the Doves -- establishes an impregnable defense shield. In retaliation, the planet of the Hawks threatens to fire a super-missile which will destroy their solar system's sun and annihilate both worlds. This maneuver is advocated by Sergo, the Hawks' chief scientist, who secretly wants to use the political instability to allow the Hawk scientists to become the new ruling power. The Doctor is too late to prevent the Hawks' missile from being launched, but convinces both planets to fire their entire nuclear arsenals after it, in the hope of destroying the missile. These melt in proximity to the sun, but the missile fails to detonate anyway. It turns out that this was the Doctor's plan all along, and by engineering the destruction of the Hawks' and Doves' nuclear stockpiles, he has incited a new concordance between the two peoples.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #258, DWM Special Edition #1, DWM Special Edition #9

The Psychonauts The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Fisher Notes: Fisher discussed this idea with script editor Douglas Adams shortly before Adams left Doctor Who in late 1979. The name Nephilim was drawn from the Old Testament and from various Jewish writings, where it refers to a kind of demon. “The Psychonauts” was not taken forward by new producer John Nathan-Turner, who instead asked Fisher to develop The Leisure Hive.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor battles the Nephilim, creatures who travel through time in sleeping units shaped like sarcophagi.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Psychrons The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Terence Greer Notes: This storyline was commissioned on June 13th, 1980. It was finally rejected sometime after April 1981, but it is not known if the idea's development extended to the point that Greer modified it to include the Fifth Doctor.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; possibly later the Fifth Doctor)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

The Queen Of Time The Second Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: “The Queen Of Time” was discovered by Mark Hayles amongst his late father's files.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS is captured by Hecuba, the Queen of Time, brethren of the Celestial Toymaker who has romantic designs on the Doctor. She challenges him to a series of contests against figures from history (including Copernicus and Nostradramus) while her servants, Snap and Drag, bedevil Jamie and Victoria with a variety of time-themed perils (such as being trapped inside a giant hourglass). The companions survive the last of these challenges and save the Doctor from being trapped for eternity in a time loop. Hecuba threatens to destroy the TARDIS in her Grand Chronometer -- the source of her power -- but has not reckoned with the time machine's invulnerability. The Grand Chronometer grinds to a halt, giving the Doctor the chance to trap Hecuba in her own time loop even as he and his friends make their escape.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Red Fort The First Doctor
Writer: Terry Nation Notes: The scripts were commissioned on September 24th, 1963. It appears that Nation, who had not particularly enjoyed writing The Daleks, did little work on “The Red Fort”, and may have even forgotten about it entirely. “The Red Fort” was intended to be the eighth story of Season One (then pushed back to ninth when Inside The Spaceship was added to the schedule in November), but was dropped altogether on January 21st, 1964. At this time, Nation was asked to write The Keys Of Marinus instead.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 7
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Storyline, possibly partial script
Synopsis: The time travellers become embroiled in the Indian Mutiny of 1857, when Indian troops rose up against the colonial officers of the British East India Company. Presumably, the assault on the Red Fort -- a Moghul palace in Delhi -- on May 11th, 1857, would have featured prominently.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #310, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Return Of The Neanderthal The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: Dixon submitted this storyline on January 16th, 1967; the use of Polly without Ben was reflective of the fact that the pair would shortly be replaced by a single, as-yet-unknown female companion.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Polly
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on the planet Terunda, where the Doctor learns that the highly-advanced Terundans have nurtured a Neanderthal culture. Some of the Neanderthals now wish to return to Earth, and the Terundans ask for the Doctor's help to facilitate this. The Doctor is reluctant because the Neanderthals are telepathic and he is suspicious of their motives, but the Terundans assure him that the Neanderthals are conditioned such that they will all die should any one of them commit an act of violence. However, once arriving on an island on 2016 Earth, the Neanderthals reveal that they intend to use their telepathy to force the humans to do their dirty work for them. They take over the island, and only the Doctor and his companions -- shielded from the Neanderthal telepathy thanks to Terundan technology -- are safe. They are cornered on a cliff edge by the Neanderthals, but one of the Neanderthals has been befriended by Jamie. She is injured trying to save them and, in a fit of rage, shoots her leader. This triggers the Terundan conditioning, and all the Neanderthals die.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Five

Return To Sukannan The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Terry Nation Notes: Nation was contracted to provide the storyline for “Return To Sukannan” on February 13th, 1975. It was not taken further, and was presumably dropped when it was decided that Nation should expand The Android Invasion into full scripts.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Revolutionaries see The Prison In Space

The Robots see The Masters Of Luxor

The Rogue TARDIS The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg submitted this idea in late 1982 after completing Enlightenment, but it was not pursued.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Time Lords ask the Doctor to find a missing Time Lord named Ajon. Locating Ajon's TARDIS, the Doctor discovers it transformed into a nightmare world where cause follows effect. Eventually, it emerges that Ajon is half-human and, in response to the suppression of his human characteristics, has regenerated into a computer which is corrupting his TARDIS. The Doctor induces Ajon to regenerate again, ending the terror.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267, DWM Special Edition #3

Romanoids The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Geoff Lowe Notes: Lowe offered this idea to script editor Christopher H Bidmead around the summer of 1980. On December 9th, Bidmead submitted the proposal to producer John Nathan-Turner for his consideration, but it was not developed further. (It is not known if the development of “Romanoids” took into account Tom Baker's decision to leave Doctor Who at the end of Season Eighteen.)
Characters: The Fourth Doctor or the Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Rosemariners The Second Doctor
aka The Rosicrutians
Writer: Donald Tosh Notes: Tosh, Doctor Who's former story editor, submitted the storyline for “The Rosicrutians” around March 1968. The idea came from research he was doing while planning his own rose garden, while the title was a variant of Rosicrucian, a secret religious society which flourished in the seventeenth century. Many of Tosh's character names were derived from rose-related terminology, such as Rugosa (from rosa rugosa, an oriental type of rose). After turning in his storyline, Tosh continued to work on a draft script of episode one -- with the title changing slightly to “The Rosemariners” -- but became busy on other work and did not maintain contact with the Doctor Who production team. By the time he was able to make significant progress on the story, it was already known that Patrick Troughton would be leaving Doctor Who and that the programme would be overhauled for Season Seven. Since it would not fit the new format, “The Rosemariners” was abandoned without ever being formally commissioned. Tosh would later adapt his script for audio, which was released in September 2012 by Big Finish Productions.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Six
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: The TARDIS materialises on an Earth space station, which has been virtually abandoned as a result of subterfuge by Rugosa, leader of the Rosemariners whose spaceship, the Rosemarinus, is nearby. The Rosemariners are using a venom secreted by their special roses to brainwash people. It transpires that the Rosemarinus is actually a prison ship; Rugosa was an inmate who managed to overthrow the wardens. He now plans an invasion of Earth, but the Doctor manages to inject Rugosa with the venom, thereby incapacitating him and returning control of the Rosemarinus to the wardens.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #211, DWM #212, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Six

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