Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (N·O)
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
?

The Nazis The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles was commissioned to write a storyline for “The Nazis” on March 8th, 1966. Shortly thereafter, however, he was engaged to write The Smugglers, which he was told should take a higher priority. “The Nazis” was ultimately abandoned on June 15th, with the sentiment being that the events it portrayed were too close to the present day.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #321, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The New Armada The First Doctor
Writer: David Whitaker Notes: By late February 1964, story editor Whitaker had decided to write one of the first recording block's final serials himself. Gerald Blake was allocated to direct. Not long after, though, he began casting about for a replacement for this untitled Armada story, eventually finding it in the form of The Reign Of Terror. By mid-April, Whitaker was considering using his Armada tale as the first serial of Doctor Who's second production block (so that it would have been broadcast after The Dalek Invasion Of Earth), although this did not ultimately come to pass. Long afterward, having since left the programme, Whitaker submitted a storyline entitled “The New Armada” -- presumably a revised version of his original idea -- to the Doctor Who production office. This was rejected on January 17th, 1966 by then-story editor Gerry Davis, who felt it was too complex, with a preponderance of characters and subplots. Nonetheless, Davis invited Whitaker to submit further ideas, eventually leading to Whitaker writing The Power Of The Daleks.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Seasons One, Two and Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set in sixteenth-century Spain after the Armada.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The New Machines The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: This idea was submitted on January 16th, 1967.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: A race of people created powerful robots but were subsequently wiped out. The robots have now become so advanced that they are, in turn, able to create a new race of people. They fear that these new humans will dominate them, and see the arrival of the Doctor on their planet as confirmation of their fears.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4

Nightmare Country The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Stephen Gallagher Notes: Gallagher submitted this storyline in late 1982, after finishing work on Season Twenty's Terminus. It was rejected on grounds of cost.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor agrees to let a race of beings called the Engineers make some repairs to the TARDIS. In return, he offers himself as a test subject for a Reality Simulator, constructed by a Master Engineer called Konis. The simulation is intended to be benign, but the Doctor finds himself amnesiac on a graveyard-like world overrun by the sinister Vodyani. In the TARDIS, Tegan and Turlough learn that the Reality Simulator actually generates a genuine alternate reality. Tegan enters the Simulator and frees the Doctor, but the Vodyani have found a way out of the machine as well. It transpires that the Vodyani were accidentally created by the mind of Konis' apprentice, Volos, who is now merging with the Vodyani leader. Volos sacrifices himself to stop the Vodyani, and Konis destroys the Reality Simulator.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #296, DWM Special Edition #3

The Nightmare Fair The Sixth Doctor
aka Arcade
Writer: Graham Williams Notes: On September 25th, 1984, former producer Graham Williams was commissioned to provide a storyline called “Arcade”. This would be set in Blackpool at the suggestion of producer John Nathan-Turner, who was inspired after Colin Baker was invited there for the grand opening of the Space Mountain attraction. Williams and script editor Eric Saward travelled to Blackpool to find suitable locations, and Saward proposed that an appropriate villain would be the eponymous being from 1966's The Celestial Toymaker. Scripts were requested on November 17th under the title “The Nightmare Fair”. It was lined up as the first story of Season Twenty-Three, to be made as Serial 7A by director Matthew Robinson (who had recently completed Attack Of The Cybermen), with Michael Gough returning as the Toymaker. Rehearsal scripts were ready by February 7th, 1985, with location filming at Blackpool scheduled to run from May 20th to 24th. On February 27th, however, it was announced that production of Doctor Who was being suspended until Spring 1986; ultimately all of the stories originally planned for Season Twenty-Three were abandoned in favour of The Trial Of A Time Lord. Target Books published Williams' novelisation of “The Nightmare Fair” in May 1989. In November 2009, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation by John Ainsworth, with David Bailie replacing the late Michael Gough as the Toymaker.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: First story of Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Full scripts
Synopsis: Vacationing at Blackpool Pleasure Beach, the Doctor and Peri meet a young man named Kevin whose brother has vanished, and learn of a spate of recent disappearances from the funfair. Investigating, they discover that the culprit is the Doctor's old foe, the Celestial Toymaker, who is studying humans to help him design a deadly videogame. This videogame, which is about to be distributed around the world, sees the player battle deadly monsters which can come to life and exit the game. The Doctor agrees to playtest the videogame, while Peri and Kevin work with the Toymaker's menagerie of alien prisoners to construct a device which will distract the Toymaker at a critical moment, freeing the Doctor. The Doctor then rewires a piece of the Toymaker's own equipment to trap the immortal being for all time in a forcefield powered by his own thoughts.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

Nightmare Planet The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Dennis Spooner Notes: Spooner's storyline commission came on January 31st, 1975, followed by a request for full scripts on February 4th. Script editor Robert Holmes became unhappy with the drugs element of Spooner's serial, and it was dropped.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a planet where the populace is unknowingly subjugated with drugs in their food and water. Misdeeds are punished with the temporary suppression of the drugs, which causes the people to see terrible monsters all around them.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies, The Doctors: 30 Years Of Time Travel

Night Thoughts The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Edward Young Notes: Young submitted “Night Thoughts” to script editor Andrew Cartmel in mid-1989. Although Cartmel felt that the script was undisciplined, he also saw a lot of potential, and was interested in following up with Young. However, any such plans were dropped when Doctor Who was cancelled that September. Young later adapted “Night Thoughts” as an audio play, released by Big Finish Productions in February 2006.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: University academics are trapped at a remote house in the winter, not realising that there is a murderer in their midst.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM Special Edition #10

The 1920s The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Stephen Fry Notes: Fry had been associated with Doctor Who via his role as the Minister of Chance in the webcast Death Comes To Time before being invited to contribute to the new Doctor Who series' second season. The 1920s setting was inspired by his screenplay for the 2003 feature film Bright Young Things. In development from about June 2005, “The 1920s” was intended to form part of the season's sixth production block. By November, however, it was realised that Fry's script would be too much of a drain on the programme's budget late in the year, and the decision was made to defer it to the 2007 season; it was replaced by Fear Her. However, the script would have to undergo rewrites -- not least to replace Rose Tyler with Martha Jones -- and Fry was now occupied with other commitments. By mid-2006, “The 1920s” was withdrawn from the schedule altogether.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Rose
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Eleventh episode of Season Twenty-Eight; Season Twenty-Nine
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a popular British legend which turns out to have an extraterrestrial connection.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #14

Nothing At The End Of The Lane The First Doctor
Writer: CE Webber Notes: Barely even rating as a “lost” story, this was the title for Doctor Who's first episode suggested by Webber in the programme's developing format guide, circa early May 1963. Biddy, Lola and Cliff would eventually become Susan, Barbara and Ian, while the idea of the Doctor being explicitly referred to as “Dr. Who” would go effectively unused. Series creator Sydney Newman also disliked the idea of the Ship being invisible. “Nothing At The End Of The Lane” would be replaced by “The Giants”.
Characters: Dr. Who, Biddy, Cliff, Lola
Episodes: 1
Planned For: The first episode of Season One
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Teenager Biddy and her teachers Lola and Cliff meet a strange, amnesiac old man and discover his invisible time machine.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #208, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Ocean Liner The First Doctor
Writer: David Ellis Notes: “The Ocean Liner” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A spy thriller.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

Operation Werewolf The Second Doctor
Writers: Douglas Camfield and Robert Kitts Notes: Camfield, who had most recently directed The Daleks' Master Plan, worked on the storyline with Kitts during 1965. It was finally submitted to the Doctor Who production office on September 18th, 1967, inviting response from producer Innes Lloyd on October 3rd. Taking on board Lloyd's suggestions, Camfield and Kitts composed a script for episode one, but “Operation: Werewolf” was thereafter dropped. Although the practise had been abandoned by that point in time, the authors nonetheless allocated an individual title to each installment; these were The Secret Army, Chateau Of Death, Lair Of The Werewolf, Friend Or Foe, Village Of The Swastika and Crossfire.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands in Normandy, France on June 1st, 1944 -- five days before D-Day. The Doctor discovers that the Nazis are developing a way to teleport troops across the English Channel: the so-called “Operation Werewolf”. To stop the Nazis, the Doctor allies himself with the Resistance -- including Fergus McCrimmon, a descendant of Jamie's -- but must first uncover the traitors within.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4

The Outcasts The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It used elements from Graham Williams and Anthony Road's The Invasion Of Time.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Master uses a Grid Lock to drain power from the Doctor's TARDIS in order to lure him back to Gallifrey. The Doctor pilots his time machine to the Gallifreyan wilderness, where the Outcasts who live there are under attack from cybernetic pirates called the Cybs. The Doctor leads the Outcasts against the Cybs and then to the Domed City from which the Master rules Gallifrey, giving him the opportunity to destroy the Grid Lock and escape the Master's trap.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
?