Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (S·T)
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The SCI The Fifth Doctor
Writer: William Emms Notes: This was offered to the production office around 1983.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved the people of the planet Alden falling under mental domination.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

A School For Glory The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Tony Etchells Notes: Etchells and an unknown co-writer submitted this anti-war polemic.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: A story of alien possession set in the British trenches of World War I and at an academy located in an English country house.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM Special Edition #10

The Sea Devils The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Malcolm Hulke's The Sea Devils.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: As the first offshore oil rigs are being established off the coast of Louisiana, the Doctor investigates a series of disappearances. He discovers that the drilling has reawakened creatures who are nicknamed “Sea Devils” but are actually Silurians, a race which thrived during the time of the dinosaurs and subsequently survived in suspended animation. The Doctor wants to make peace between mankind and the Silurians, but the Master plans to deceive the Silurians into trapping the Doctor.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

Sealed Orders The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Christopher Priest Notes: Priest originally began devising this idea with script editor Douglas Adams around October 1978. Little progress was made, but it was revived when Priest was independently approached by Adams' successor, Christopher H Bidmead, who was a fan of Priest's novels; they decided to resurrect “Sealed Orders”. A storyline was commissioned on February 27th, 1980, followed by full scripts on March 24th. By this time, “Sealed Orders” was planned to conclude a trilogy of stories set in the pocket universe of E-Space, and would feature the departures of Romana and K·9. However, Priest was not accustomed to writing for television, and it became clear that his scripts were not suitable for production. Bidmead provided the author with heavily-edited samples as guidance for what he wanted, but Priest objected to these, and their relationship deteriorated. Priest stopped working on “Sealed Orders” in April, and Warriors' Gate took its place. “Sealed Orders” was formally abandoned in June, although Bidmead and producer John Nathan-Turner still hoped that it could be revisited in the future.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9, Adric
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fifth story of Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: A political thriller set on Gallifrey in which the Doctor is seemingly ordered to kill Romana by the Time Lords. A complex plot involving time paradoxes would result in the appearance of a second Doctor (who dies) and lead to Romana's departure; it also involved the idea of time running into itself, resulting in one TARDIS existing inside another.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM #315, DWM Special Edition #9

The Sea Of Fear The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles submitted this storyline on March 9th, 1974, after completing work on The Monster Of Peladon.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twelve
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on an island where the ape-like Simiads and the amphibious Zelons are at war. The conflict is being provoked by technicians from Research Inc under the command of Director Korbyn. Research Inc has travelled back in time from Earth City in the far future in order to determine which of the two races is an ancestor of Man. Once this is known, any denizens of Earth City who manifest the other race's lineage will be purged under the orders of the Great Leader. But the Great Leader knows that he is of Simiad strain and has planted an agent, Dr Rojel, amongst the Research Inc staff to tip the scales against the Zelons. However, the Doctor discovers that pollution from the Research Inc facility is having a degenerative effect on the Simiads -- which Korbyn tries to cover up by activing a self-destruct mechanism. The Doctor stops him by using the TARDIS to scramble the signal, and reveals that the Simiads and Zelons are actually two forms of the same race.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

The Second Coming The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Jack Trevor Story Notes: Story was part of the original writing team for what would become The Trial Of A Time Lord. He and David Halliwell were asked to develop the “future” element of the evidence against the Doctor. These would be two linked two-part adventures, which would share most of their sets (as had also been done in Season Twelve with The Ark In Space and Revenge Of The Cybermen). After an initial meeting of the writers with script editor Eric Saward on July 9th, 1985, Story was commissioned for “The Second Coming” on July 26th. However, despite meeting with Halliwell in order to ensure that their serials melded well, Story appeared to have difficulty understanding how to write for Doctor Who. Saward recalled Story becoming fixated on specific details, such as the image of a man playing a saxophone inside a gasometer. “The Second Coming” was abandoned by mid-October, with the “future” segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord ultimately written by Pip and Jane Baker.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Mel
Episodes:2
Planned For: The fourth segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord for Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Unknown
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Secret Of Cassius The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: Although “The Secret Of Cassius” was rejected by script editor Anthony Read in August 1978, Read encouraged Smith to continue writing. Read was unaware that Smith was a Doctor Who fan in his mid-teens, but this eventually led to Smith's commission for Full Circle eighteen months later.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Shada The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Douglas Adams' Shada.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor brings a Time Lord named Romana to visit her uncle, who is living in retirement on modern-day Earth. Romana's uncle tells the Doctor about a secret Time Lord prison planet called Shada, and he comes to suspect that his long-lost father, Ulysses, is being held there. However, the ancient book needed to travel to Shada soon disappears... and then so does Romana's uncle.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Shadow People The Third Doctor
Writers: Charlotte and Dennis Plimmer Notes: The Plimmers submitted their storyline to the Doctor Who production office on November 10th, 1969 and it was given serious consideration for the final slot of Season Seven. However, a subsequent pay dispute with the Plimmers meant that “The Shadow People” was abandoned shortly thereafter.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Liz
Episodes: 7
Planned For: Final story of Season Seven
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2

The Shape Of Terror The Third Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: This idea was submitted during the spring of 1971. It was rejected by script editor Terrance Dicks, but the idea of an Agatha Christie-style mystery was attractive and was incorporated into The Curse Of Peladon.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Nine
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A rescue team led by Commander Hallett is summoned to research station Pi Delta 6 on the planet Medusa Centaurus. Hallett arrives to find the station deserted, and his security officer, Garford, believes it has been attacked by pirates. Indeed, when the TARDIS brings the Doctor and Jo to Pi Delta 6, Garford accuses them of being associated with the pirates. In fact, the station has fallen victim to the Energid, a shapeshifting protoplasmic entity which can absorb people's brains. The Energid wishes to merge with the Doctor, but when the Energid attempts the fusion, the Doctor manages to rally the minds of those whom the Energid had previously consumed, and the creature is destroyed.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #219, Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

Shield Of Zarak The Fourth Doctor
aka The Doppelgangers, Shield Of Zareg
Writer: Ted Lewis Notes: Lewis, whose novel Jack's Return Home was filmed as the 1971 Michael Caine hit Get Carter, had worked with Doctor Who producer Graham Williams on Z Cars. Williams was eager to bring Lewis onto Doctor Who, and so “The Doppelgangers” was commissioned in storyline form on January 7th, 1978, and as full scripts as “Shield Of Zarak” on February 24th. However, Lewis was not well-acquainted with Doctor Who, and as his scripts began to arrive in late April, it was clear that they needed work. Sadly, Lewis had begun a descent into alcoholism amidst marital difficulties, and was drunk when he met with Williams and script editor Anthony Read to discuss “Shield Of Zarak” (which may also have gone by “Shield Of Zareg”). By the middle of May, the serial had been abandoned, and was ultimately replaced by The Androids Of Tara; it was formally rejected on January 11th, 1979. Lewis never worked for the BBC again.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fourth story of Season Sixteen
Stage Reached: Partial script
Synopsis: Dealt with the notion that legendary heroes might, in reality, have been the antithesis of the way history would ultimately portray them. Apparently, the specific example planned was to have the Doctor and Romana encounter Robin Hood in their search for the fourth segment of the Key To Time, only to discover that the alleged hero was actually a blackhearted villain.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Shield Of Zareg see Shield Of Zarak

Shrine The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: After “Cat's Cradle” was rejected, Platt developed this idea in late 1987 with the help of Doctor Who script editor Andrew Cartmel and writer Ben Aaronovitch. It was inspired by Leo Tolstoy's 1869 novel War And Peace, as well as the works of Gormenghast author Mervyn Peake. During 1988, however, Platt stopped working on “Shrine” in favour of “Lungbarrow”.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Five or Twenty-Six
Stage Reached: Unknown
Synopsis: In 1820 Russia, the Doctor and Ace arrive at the home of Alexei Semyonovitch. A race of stone-headed aliens arrive searching for their God-King, who has been reincarnated as a serf.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #190, DWM Special Edition #10

Shylock see The Doomsday Contract

The Silent Scream The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: This was an unsolicted submission made by Boucher to the production office in early 1975. It was not felt to be suitable for Doctor Who, but encouraged producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes to work with Boucher on further ideas.
Characters: Presumably the Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Six Doctors The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Robert Holmes Notes: Holmes' involvement in Doctor Who's twentieth-anniversary special was encouraged by script editor Eric Saward, despite producer John Nathan-Turner's preference to avoid using writers associated with the programme's past. Holmes was skeptical that a good story could be written which would involve all five Doctors, plus their companions, as well as the Master and the Cybermen, but agreed to develop a suitable storyline, commissioned on August 2nd, 1982. He came up with three ideas, the first of which he was told to develop as “The Six Doctors”. (The cyborg element in this version was introduced to account for the absence of William Hartnell, the First Doctor, who had died in 1975.) One of Holmes' alternatives followed the same basic plot, but saw the Cybermen's surgeries cause the Fifth Doctor to regress back through his past incarnations; Holmes was dubious about including other companions in this scenario. A second, less well-formed idea, involved the TARDIS itself conjuring images of former Doctors and companions to help the current Doctor battle an ancient supercomputer. (Holmes was unsure how to involve the Cybermen in this version.) By the autumn, however, it became clear to Saward that Holmes was making little headway with “The Six Doctors”, and asked former script editor Terrance Dicks to prepare a back-up storyline. Holmes formally withdrew from the anniversary special on October 13th, although his renewed contact with the production office did lead to a commission for Season Twenty-One's The Caves Of Androzani. Elements of his ideas for “The Six Doctors” were later reused in Season Twenty-Two's The Two Doctors.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, the Fourth Doctor, the Third Doctor, the Second Doctor, Tegan, Jamie, Susan
Episodes: 1 (90 minutes)
Planned For: Between Seasons Twenty and Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Partial script
Synopsis: The Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Doctors (with their companions, including Jamie and Tegan) are drawn to the planet Maladoom, where they meet the First Doctor and Susan. They are trapped by the Master, who is working for the Cybermen. The Cybermen want to isolate the genetic component which permits Time Lords to travel freely in time and space; they will incorporate this factor into their own biology and conquer the time vortex. The Doctors manage to escape, but the First Doctor and Susan are really cyborgs created by the Cybermen. The other Doctors manage to destroy the duplicates and discover that it is the Master's TARDIS which has brought them to Maladoom. It is now operating out of control and threatens the universe, but the Doctors are able to deactivate it and return to their proper places in the timeline.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #313, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The Fifth Doctor

The Sleepwalkers The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: Dixon submitted this storyline on January 16th, 1967; the use of Polly without Ben was reflective of the fact that the pair would shortly be replaced by a single, as-yet-unknown female companion.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Polly
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands on far-future Earth, where a great conflict has reduced the world's populace to only a few hundred, living in isolated communities ignorant of each others' existence. One such community is made up of quarrelling Elders and young people who are dependent upon robots for their subsistence; however, these robots have recently stopped functioning. The Doctor realises that the robots are powered by hydroelectricity, and uses a fire and some silver iodine powder to bring about a rainstorm. This solves the problem, but also attracts the attention of another community, whose more warlike denizens attack. The Doctor is finally forced to modify some robots for use as weapons. Pacified, the attackers soon agree to work together with the Elders and their younger counterparts. However, before the Doctor can deactivate all the modified robots, two of them manage to construct a primitive TARDIS and escape.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Five

The Slide The First Doctor
Writer: Victor Pemberton Notes: Pemberton's storyline was rejected on September 24th, 1964, by story editor David Whitaker, who felt that “The Slide” was a “stewpot” of earlier Doctor Who science-fiction ideas with a hint of Nigel Kneale's Quatermass serials. However, Pemberton had also submitted a version of “The Slide” to BBC Radio on August 17th; this audio treatment saw the Doctor replaced by Chilean seismologist Professor Joseph Gomez. This seven-part version of “The Slide” was transmitted weekly on the BBC Light Programme beginning on February 13th, 1966. The following year, Pemberton adapted “The Slide” as the Doctor Who adventure Fury From The Deep.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian Barbara
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Two
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A sentient form of mud emerges from a fissure and begins to take over the minds of British townsfolk.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #277, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

Soldar And The Plastoids The Fourth Doctor
Writer: John Bennett Notes: Bennett's storyline was commissioned on April 10th, 1980. It may have been intended for Season Nineteen only; at this point, Tom Baker had not yet decided to leave Doctor Who.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen (possibly also Season Eighteen)
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Son Of Doctor Who The First Doctor
Writer: None (originated by William Hartnell) Notes: Hartnell was interested in playing characters other than the Doctor in Doctor Who. As a mechanism for achieving this, he suggested that he could also play the Doctor's son, who would be an adversary for the Doctor. This does not appear to have been seriously pursued.
Characters: The First Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Seasons Two or Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor encounters his evil time-travelling son, to whom he bears an uncanny physical resemblance.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #233

The Song Of The Space Whale The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor The Sixth Doctor
aka The Space Whale, Space-Whale
Writers: Pat Mills and John Wagner Notes: Mills and Wagner were writing comics for Doctor Who Weekly when they devised this concept. Mills' wife, Angie, felt that it was too good for the comic, and should be offered to the Doctor Who production team instead. Although Wagner was skeptical, it was submitted in late 1980, alongside three other ideas Mills had conceived. The storyline was commissioned on September 9th, 1981 under the title “Space-Whale” (which saw the Fourth Doctor replaced by the Fifth), followed by the full scripts on December 2nd as “The Song Of The Space Whale”. Around this time, Wagner decided that he was not interested in remaining on the project, and Mills forged ahead alone. It was decided that “The Song Of The Space Whale” would be the introductory story for new companion Turlough. He replaced Rina's original boyfriend, John, and would now leave with the Doctor instead of Rina because he claims that space travel is in his blood. Soon thereafter, however, the scripts ran into problems when script editor Eric Saward objected to Mills' working-class depiction of Greeg, and his portrayal of the castaways as a colony of mystics. The writer was unable to develop an alternative which was acceptable to Saward, and so “The Song Of The Space Whale” was replaced by Mawdryn Undead. Mills and Saward continued to work on the scripts -- now simply called “The Space Whale” -- and Mills eventually replacing the castaways with a marooned family. The Sixth Doctor and Peri became the main characters, and the scripts were rewritten as two forty-five minute episodes in accordance with the new format for Season Twenty-Two. Saward continued to have misgivings about the serial, however, and around the middle of May 1984, “The Space Whale” was replaced in the schedule by Vengeance On Varos. It appears that further development of Mills' scripts was undertaken, but they were finally abandoned around July 1985. Mills later wrote an audio adaptation of his story, released as “Song Of The Megaptera” by Big Finish Productions in May 2010.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission); the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan (revised version); the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan, Turlough (second revision); the Sixth Doctor, Peri (third revision)
Episodes: 4 (2 45-minute episodes, third revision)
Planned For: Third story of Season Twenty; second story of Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS is captured by Captain Greeg of the spaceship Orkas when the Doctor interferes with his attempts to hunt a massive Ghaleen -- a “space whale” with the ability to travel in time. Also on the Orkas are Krakos, an alien Tuthon who wants to steal the orb which powers the Ghaleen's time travel, and Rina, who believes that a community of castaways is living in the belly of the Ghaleen, and who has stowed away aboard Greeg's vessel in the hope of rescuing them. In fact, the castaways have constructed a “raft-ship” which would permit them to escape, but their leader, Waldron, has not disclosed the fact that the device works, because he believes that by remaining within the Ghaleen, they are living a life safe from the outside universe. Krakos succeeds in seizing the orb, however, causing temporal energy -- which induces “time necrosis” -- to flood out of the Ghaleen. The Doctor uses the raft-ship to reverse the damage, and Krakos is killed trying to escape the Ghaleen's belly. The castaways are rescued, but Waldron has been inside the Ghaleen for so long that when he attempts to leave, he dies of time necrosis. Greeg is overthrown by his second-in-command, Stennar, and the Ghaleen is allowed to return to its pod.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 228, 229, DWM Special Edition #s 1, 3, 9, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Space Sargasso The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Philip Martin Notes: Martin submitted this idea on December 28th, 1983, while awaiting feedback on Season Twenty-Two's Vengeance On Varos. On March 9th, 1984, script editor Eric Saward noted that more development would be needed before he could properly assess “Space Sargasso”; the notion was not pursued further.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The TARDIS is drawn to an area of space filled with wrecked ships. A creature called the Engineer, who is in thrall to the Master, is using parts from the vessels to construct an immense warship.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #309

Space Station The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Christopher Langley Notes: Langley's storyline was submitted on December 30th, 1973, and he was commissioned on January 24th, 1974. Season Twelve was largely constructed around “Space Station”, with Revenge Of The Cybermen designed to use the same sets and The Sontaran Experiment intended to continue the story thread of Earth's abandonment by humanity. “Space Station” and The Sontaran Experiment would also have been made as essentially one large recording block -- since the former was entirely confined to the studio and the latter would be made only on location -- sharing the same director and crew. Around late May, however, it was clear that Langley's scripts were unacceptable, and the decision was made to replace “Space Station” with The Ark In Space. “Space Station” was officially dropped on June 17th.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane, Harry
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Second story of Season Twelve
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Apparently set on a far-future space station during a period when mankind is no longer living on Earth.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Space War The Third Doctor
aka The Furies
Writer: Ian Stuart Black Notes: Nearly four years after The Macra Terror, his last contribution to Doctor Who, Black was commissioned to write a storyline entitled “The Space War” (later changed to “The Furies”) on November 9th, 1970. Although Black delivered this toward the end of the month, it did not proceed to script form.
Characters: The Third Doctor
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Eight
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #308, DWM Special Edition #2

The Space Whale see The Song Of The Space Whale

Space-Whale see The Song Of The Space Whale

The Spare-Part People The Third Doctor
aka The Brain Drain, The Labyrinth
Writer: Jon Pertwee and Reed de Rouen Notes: Submitted around the summer of 1970, it does not appear that the storyline was seriously considered by the production team.
Characters: The Third Doctor
Episodes: 7
Planned For: Season Eight
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor poses as Cambridge don Dr John Madden to investigate a spate of celebrity disappearances. He is kidnapped by mummy-like beings who take him to Antarctica, where a hidden civilisation exists. There the Doctor participates in brutal games and combats a monster which dwells in a labyrinth.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2

The Stones Of Darkness The Second Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: “The Stones Of Darkness” was discovered by Mark Hayles amongst his late father's files.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, either Victoria or Zoe
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Five or Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Visiting Stonehenge, the time travellers are astonished to see a man materialise in its midst. They track him to nearby Darkhill Manor, where they meet Professor Storp and his assistant Reana. The man from Stonehenge is introduced as another associate, Alvec. However, the Doctor's suspicions are aroused when Jamie watches a tramp who had broken into the Manor vanish from Stonehenge and later reappear as yet another aide named Ganis. With the help of European Security agent Bennett, the Doctor discovers that Storp and his friends are aliens who have turned Stonehenge into a transporter. They plan to use the technology to covertly replace four soldiers who have control of their countries' respective nuclear arsenals, laying waste to the Earth and paving the way for Storp's planet to invade. With Bennett's help, the Doctor banishes Storp and his cronies back to their own world, and then locks the arrival point at Stonehenge inside a forcefield to prevent their return.
References: Nothing At The End Of The Lane #3

Strange Encounter see Volvok

The Strange Suffragettes see The Prison In Space

The Suicide Exhibition The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Mark Gatiss Notes: Gatiss began working on this script around the start of 2006, at which point it was sent during World War I. By early 2007, the setting had been shifted to the Second World War and “The Suicide Exhibition” was intended to be the third episode of Doctor Who's 2008 season. Some thought was given to filming in the Natural History Museum itself, but executive producer Russell T Davies gradually became concerned about revisiting the World War II period so soon after it was showcased in 2005's The Empty Child / The Doctor Dances. Furthermore, Davies was becoming excited by the possibility of setting an adventure around the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. Finally, near the end of April 2007, it was decided to replace “The Suicide Exhibition” with The Fires Of Pompeii. Later that summer, scripting problems on this episode and Partners In Crime led Davies to consider abandoning The Fires Of Pompeii and reinstating Gatiss' script, but this did not come to pass.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Donna
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Third episode of Season Thirty
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: During the Second World War, a Nazi task force assaults the Natural History Museum in London, which has been overrun by monsters. Later action would have involved the discovery of a secret chamber beneath the museum.
References: Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale, Doctor Who Magazine #431, DWM Special Edition #26

The Talons Of Weng-Chiang The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Robert Holmes' The Talons Of Weng-Chiang.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In modern-day New York City, the Doctor joins forces with a police officer to investigate a series of murders being committed by a Chinese gang called the Tong of the Black Scorpion. The Tong's leader, Weng-Chiang, is actually a criminal from the future named Magnus Greel, who needs to absorb life energy as a result of a failed experiment.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Tearing Of The Veil The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Alan Drury Notes: Drury was commissioned by script editor Douglas Adams on April 2nd, 1979. He delivered his first two scripts in early May, at which point it was decided that “The Tearing Of The Veil” was not working out. Nonetheless, Adams continued to discuss the story with Drury over the summer, and by September 19th an acceptable draft had been completed. “The Tearing Of The Veil” was then passed to Adams' successor, Christopher H Bidmead, for possible use in Season Eighteen. However, Bidmead disliked the whimsical science-fiction favoured by Adams, and since Drury's story was in line with this approach, it was discarded by the new production team.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K·9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Seventeen and Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: An evil force pursues the TARDIS to a Victorian vicarage, where the vicar's widow is being defrauded by phoney spiritualists. As supernatural phenomena grip the vicarage, the con artists are killed off one by one. Even K·9 is apparently torn apart by a poltergeist, while much of the Doctor's life force is drained from him, turning him into a disinterested crank wandering about in his nightgown.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM Special Edition #9

Thin Ice The Seventh Doctor
aka Ice Time
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: Sophie Aldred was contracted for eight episodes during Season Twenty-Seven, and so it was planned to write Ace out halfway through the year. Platt was asked to develop an Ice Warrior story, and while his inclination was to write a futuristic adventure set on a terraformed Mars, script editor Andrew Cartmel requested that he use a 1960s setting in light of the success of Season Twenty-Five's Remembrance Of The Daleks. Producer John Nathan-Turner wanted to use the popular London Dungeon attraction as a filming location. Platt's story would be linked with the third story of Season Twenty-Seven (which has become known as “Crime Of The Century”), which would also feature Cunningham and his daughter Raine, but in the present day. The adult Raine would become the Doctor's new companion, while Platt hoped that the elder Cunningham would be a recurring ally in the manner of UNIT's Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart. Cartmel hoped to involve Ian Briggs, who had effectively created Ace, in the development of Platt's ideas, but the entire project was scuppered when Doctor Who was cancelled in September 1989. The title “Ice Time” was assigned by Doctor Who Magazine in 1997. This did not find favour with Platt, who changed it to “Thin Ice” when he adapted his ideas for Big Finish Productions; the resulting audio was released in April 2011. For this version, Cunningham's surname became Creevy to avoid confusion with a real Raine Cunningham.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Probably the second story of Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor wants to enrol Ace at the Time Lord Academy on Gallifrey, but she must pass a final test to gain admission. In 1960s England, parts of the armour of an infamous Ice Lord have inadvertently become incorporated into a display at the London Dungeon. Elsewhere, another Ice Warrior awaits the revival of his longtime rival. The Doctor and Ace find an unlikely ally in a hippie named Cunningham with underworld connections; when his pregnant wife gives birth, the Doctor delivers the baby girl, called Raine, and becomes her godfather. Having succeeded in her audition, Ace leaves the Doctor to stay on Gallifrey -- where they both hope that she will become a force for change in Time Lord society, dispelling the lethargy that has burdened it for millennia.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM #433, DWM Special Edition #10

Tomb Of The Cybs The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Kit Pedler and Garry Davis' The Tomb Of The Cybermen.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In the future, the Doctor joins an expedition on the planet Telos which seeks to excavate a tomb containing the last of the Cybs, a race of cybernetic pirates. However, the Cybs are only in suspended animation, and are reawakened by the Master.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Torson Triumvirate The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: Smith, who had recently completed Full Circle, was commissioned to provide a storyline on November 25th, 1980. This was submitted on December 9th and was still being considered in April 1981, but was ultimately not pursued.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on present-day Earth.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432, DWM Special Edition #9

Transit The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Ben Aaronovitch Notes: This idea was submitted in June 1987. Aaronovitch later developed it into a Doctor Who: The New Adventures novel of the same name, featuring the Seventh Doctor and Bernice Summerfield. It was published in December 1992 by Virgin Books.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Five
Stage Reached: Unknown
Synopsis: In the future, a system of transportation portals spans the solar system, but now seems to have opened a gateway to Hell.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #10

Twin World The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: This idea was submitted on January 16th, 1967.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: On a planet in a binary star system, every birth produces twins who are the polar opposites of one another. The power of the ruling twins is governed by the prominence in the sky of the planet's two suns. As the Doctor arrives, the sun related to the evil twin is about to enter a prolonged period of ascendancy, and the good people of the world fear that by the time this period ends, their planet may be doomed. The Doctor saves the day with the use of a simple invention.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Five

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